Flash Gordon Left Me The Keys

The TEST OF ALL MOTHERS

Sunday, March 23, 2003

 
Having a terrible time with this one!!! The mother of all!!!
 
Milo & Kelly are laughing their asses off ... WILL COME TO THE RESCUE of candy nose:
Will put tag on the "Grouping"

American and British troops were only just beginning to seize parts of Iraq when the jockeying to replace Saddam Hussein began. For years a motley crew of Iraqi exiles, ranging from indicted war criminals to convicted embezzlers, have presented themselves as potential heirs to Saddam, and many have enjoyed American support. Now a new faction aspiring to power in a postwar Iraq has arrived on the scene, and this time it is emerging from within Saddam's regime.
A group of Iraqi élites still inside the country is preparing to announce the formation of a political movement that is ready to replace Saddam's Baath Party, a U.S. source close to the group tells TIME. Communicating secretly with one another via emissaries over the past six months, the group claims to include a cabinet minister, military officers, university professors, tribal sheiks and other élite members of Iraq's Sunni, Shi'ite and Kurdish factions. They promise to hand over all weapons of mass destruction, disband the Republican Guard and establish a representative government. Until Saddam's demise, these Iraqis are identifying themselves only as al-Tajammua, Arabic for "the Grouping."

Is al-Tajammua the answer for a post-Saddam Iraq? Not necessarily. Members of the upper ranks of Iraq's power structure may have been complicit in Saddam's years of brutal rule and may not be the democrats Washington has hoped will succeed Saddam. "The idea that the U.S. would simply issue orders to the same mob that served under Saddam is ridiculous," Pentagon adviser Richard Perle said last month. But the State Department and the CIA seem more flexible. The future of Baath Party members, said State Department spokesman Richard Boucher, "will depend on the outcome of the conflict, and the actions of individuals in that party who may or may not further the crimes of the regime."




 
Tommy Gun Frank ... c'mon... Friendly fire shit..

LONDON, England (CNN) -- A British Royal Air Force aircraft returning from a mission in Iraq was possibly shot down by Patriot missiles near the Kuwaiti border, British and U.S. military officials said Sunday.


"Evidence is beginning to come to light that one of our aircraft returning from operations over Iraq last night may have been engaged by a U.S. Patriot missile battery," said Capt. Al Lockwood with the British Royal Air Force in Qatar.

"The evidence is begging to appear that this very well may have been a friendly fire incident."

"The crew of the aircraft is missing," a British defense ministry statement said.



 
Where are the goods?

“US officer” Joins Lebanese ex-President for Last-Ditch Mediation

From DEBKA-Net-Weekly’s Intelligence Exclusive of March 14

March 16, 2003, 2:51 PM (GMT+02:00)

A secret Washington-sponsored mediation effort, in progress since early March, has just about run its course in the diplomatic twilight zone behind the emergency summit taking place at Praia Da Vitoria in the Azores Islands of Portugal Sunday, March 16, between US president George W. Bush and the two European prime ministers, Tony Blair of Britain and of Spain. As they three allies prepared to meet, their options were further reduced by a joint statement from France Russia and Germany that they were against submitting Saddam any ultimatum to disarm. Saddam, however, was not waiting. He set the scene for the Azores summit by putting his country on a war footing, taking command of the Iraqi air force and dividing the country into four military districts with orders to “destroy any foreign aggression”. His younger son Qusay was put in command of the key Baghdad district.

That move was the Iraqi ruler’s reply to a secret US mediator’s final effort to persuade him to remove himself in order to stave off war.

DEBKA-Net-Weekly’s intelligence sources reveal this last mediator as former Lebanese president Amin Gemayel. Denials apart, he was in Baghdad Saturday, March 15, for the third visit of his mission, which was to sell Washington’s final offer to the Iraqi rule to quit Iraq with his family – including his sons Uday and Qusay – and the country’s top political and military leadership, and go into exile in an Arab country.

The offer included safe conduct guarantees for Saddam and his entourage along with a US pledge not to freeze his secret bank accounts.

The Iraqi ruler’s response to Gemayel – as to all of a long line of would-be mediators – was a refusal to consider any exile or refuge that divested him of ruling authority.

Gemayel’s personal relationship with Saddam dates to back to the 1970s and early 1980s, when he was chief of the Lebanese Christian Phalange militia in Beirut. In those days, he was often in Baghdad to collect Saddam’s largesse to the tune of millions of dollars for his Christian fighters. They have remained friends.

On his penultimate trip to Baghdad on March 7-10, our intelligence sources discovered Gemayel took with him a special guest – an American colonel. This officer, another old Baghdad hand, was received by Saddam for an afternoon tete a tete on March 8. In the Iran-Iraq War in the 1980s, the colonel paid a number of secret visits to Baghdad and was there again just before the first Gulf War in 1991.

DEBKAfile’s Iraqi underground sources reveal that, on the same day, a failed attempt was made on the life of Saddam’s elder son Uday at the al-Jadariye Boating Club on the Tigris River. There with a party, he is thought to have escaped with injuries from this second known assassination attempt, while three of his bodyguards were killed.

DEBKA-Net-Weekly’s intelligence sources report that the American crossed into Iraq - either from Kuwait or Saudi Arabia. Gemayel and senior Iraqi intelligence officials stood by to fly with him by plane and then helicopter to a secret meeting place near Baghdad.

A senior intelligence source, who was briefed on the conversation between Saddam and the US officer, reports that the Lebanese ex-president and an interpreter – a short man who spoke only whenever Saddam whispered something in his ear – were also present.

After Saddam warmly shook his hand, the American said: “It’s been a long time since I last saw you, but you seem to be in great shape. You are a great soldier and I looking forward to facing you on the battlefield.”

”When do you intend to attack and try to kill me?” Saddam asked.

”Basically, after the March 19 deadline passes,” came the reply.

”You managed to get me to destroy my missiles,” the Iraqi leader said, pausing for effect. “Is the 19th the date of the attack or just the day when you want me to leave Iraq? After all, that’s what you came for.”

The US colonel answered: “According to our orders, that’s the date when we are supposed to head out and get you. And we’ve already been told, ‘Don’t come back with him left in place.’”

Saddam was not pleased. “You are the sons of Satan. Go to hell. I’m not afraid of you.”

”We may not even wait until the 19th now,” the colonel shot back.

”Well then,” Saddam said. “What’s the offer and where do you want me to go?”

”Egypt, Sudan, Syria – there’s a long list of offers. Even Iran made an offer.”

A defiant Saddam answered in English: “I will die before I surrender.”

Tempers flared as the colonel told the Iraqi leader: “If you don’t leave, we will target you.”

A fuming Saddam began talking gibberish, before finally calming down and whispering something to the interpreter, who said: “The president believes he is going to send you back to your leaders in a box as a message.”

The American officer was unfazed.

“In that case, the war would start today,” he replied. “We know where you are every day.”

“I have no fear of death,” Saddam said.

According to DEBKA-Net-Weekly’s sources, the conversation then turned to the underground bunkers where Saddam and his family planned to seek shelter from US bombs.

”How long do you think you can hold out there? Maybe four to six weeks, tops,” the colonel said.

”Don’t worry, when I have to get out, I will,” Saddam said.

”We all know that if you leave your shelter after the war begins, the people on the street and Iraqi troops will tear you to shreds,” the officer said.

Saddam replied with a dismissive wave of the hand.

Time was up, and Gemayel and the colonel flew back to the Iraqi border. At the frontier, Gemayel bade the officer farewell and returned to Saddam’s palace in Baghdad.

According to our information, the US colonel arrived in Kuwait early on Wednesday, March 12, and made his report immediately to Washington. From Baghdad, Gemayel made his way to Amman and sent his own equally pessimistic report to Washington.





 
Lets Put The Train Back On Track°.... Iran & Syria

Q. Rachel, do you think the Bush administration could have done a better job in trying to get Security Council backing for the war in Iraq? And does it matter that it did not get that backing?

A. We have seen a diplomatic train wreck.

The French and Germans have been real contributors to it. But I'm going to focus on the U.S. side of things, since that is the question.

The Bush administration came to power with a notion that "if we say it, they will follow." Many in this administration believed that President Clinton did not show resolve and commitment and therefore did not lead the international community. This administration decided to pursue an alternative course. They alienated many around the world, but even worse, they did not build a strategy for bringing along ambivalent partners.

The second problem is that this lack of strategy led them to make policy decisions that have been contrary to alliance building. The doctrine of pre-emption alienated many around the world who we would have liked to have been helpful to us.

The third problem is that they never got "on message." They kept changing what this was about--disarmament, regime change, terrorism, or democracy. You can weave a story together about how all of this fits, but they never did.

Fourth, they never put together a compelling vision about post-conflict Iraq. Many around the world believe we have no idea what we are getting ourselves into, and will leave a mess on Iraq's neighbors' doorsteps when we decide things are too hard, or other problems are more compelling. Only very, very recently did the administration begin talking about post-conflict Iraq, and unfortunately it has been too little too late.

Q. On the question of Iraq after the war, what are some of the geopolitical implications of a war with Iraq? Do you think President Bush is failing to recognize some of these implications? Would an independent Kurdistan be a disaster?

A. The current policy of containment was becoming a disaster. It required the continuation of economic sanctions which targeted the Iraqi middle class and the most innocent and vulnerable in that society. Saddam built palaces while his people had nothing. Sanctions are an immoral policy, and we are right to change it. Unfortunately, lifting sanctions would only have allowed Saddam to continue to build up and threaten us and his neighbors.

Also, the heavy American troop presence that containment required was becoming a liability for us and our partners. It was giving succor to the region's radicals who recruited on the message of Americans in the holy land (Saudi Arabia). Osama bin Laden is the most extreme example.

The United States has been containing not only Iraq, but its neighbors as well. This was a terrible policy.

I bring all this up because it's not a choice between an acceptable policy and another one. The current policy was bad for the U.S., bad for the Iraqis, and bad for the region.

Does George Bush know what he's getting into? If things go well, many of the worst scenarios will be avoided. It will be hard to march in protest in Cairo and Paris if there is dancing in Basra.

But getting Iraq back on its feet will mean an initial commitment to ensuring "law and order," and that requires the United States to use its soldiers to "police and pacify." That is something the president actually campaigned against. I hope the president is committed to this. He is saying the right things, but our half-hearted efforts in Afghanistan make our friends and allies nervous.

Other risks: the story of burning oil fields is very worrisome. Iraqis will need their oil to rebuild. It will be very costly even with Iraq producing oil at full capacity. The estimated cost of reconstruction is between 25 billion and 100 billion dollars. Iraq produces only about 12 billion to 14 billion dollars a year in oil, in current prices.

There are risks about what the neighbors will do. Turkey and Iran must be encouraged to stay out.

There are risks about what the Iraqis will do to each other, given the decades of brutality they have lived through.

These problems are manageable, but it will take skillful diplomacy.

Q. Will Iran view a U.S.-dominated Iraq next door as a serious threat to its national security, thus leading to an acceleration in its plans to obtain nuclear weapons? And do you think it will encourage the Shiites in Basra to break away?

A. By all accounts, Iran has accelerated its nuclear program without the United States sitting in Iraq.

Iran lives in a difficult neighborhood, with Pakistan, India, and Iraq all within striking reach. If Iraq can be effectively disarmed, it should ease some Iranian concerns. That is why Iran has been notably quiet.

The Shiites in Iraq have repeatedly shown themselves to be Iraqi nationals. Saddam was worried they would fight with Iran during the Iran-Iraq war. They didn't. I think the more likely scenario is that the Shi'a will look for fair representation in any new government, not to break away from Iraq.

Q. President Bush last week endorsed the "road map" for an Israeli-Palestinian peace process. How can the world expect peace to occur between Palestinians and Israelis when racial hatred towards Jews is so deeply ingrained in the minds of many Arabs?

And the reverse. Do you think that after the regime change in Iraq, the Bush administration will press Sharon on settlement activity? And if so, why?

A. When the peace process was going well, Qatar opened an economic interest office for the Israeli government. When things were going well, Jordanian-Israeli trade was increasing and Israeli tour guides operated in Jordan. Hardly a racial hatred. I would cast it more as political anger by most, and bigoted anti-semitism by some.

Ideas on both sides have evolved over time, and evolved more quickly when political conditions were more positive.

Some in the administration appear very committed to turning attention to the Israeli-Palestinian crisis. [Deputy Defense Secretary] Paul Wolfowitz has directed his attention to the problem of settlements. Others in the administration do not think there's anything the U.S. can do about what's going on. As with everything else in this administration, there will be a policy battle on the issue that we will all have to watch.

Q. On an Israeli-Palestinian peace, do you expect that pressure will be brought by Washington on Israel to stop the settlements simultaneous with the Palestinians agreeing to halt terror?

A. No. the president has been very clear in his statements of late that once terror stops, then Israel will be pressured to stop the settlements. The administration views these events occurring sequentially.

Q. Does that undercut the "road map" formula?

A. Yes, parts of it anyway.

Q. In your opinion, how should Iraq be ruled after the war ends?

A. In the short term, the United States will have to be in charge, and by short term I mean weeks, perhaps a couple of months. Law and order will have to be ensured and humanitarian assistance provided. The power must be kept on and the water purified. The Iraqi ministries can continue to function (minus the ministers), but we cannot afford a vacuum to form.

However, as quickly as possible, we must design a mechanism by which we hand over political responsibility (although the Iraqis are likely to expect us to continue to ensure security) to the Iraqis. In Afghanistan, a very respected, internationally-recognized figure took the helm, working hand-in-glove with the U.N. This model is a good place to start.

Given the current acrimony between the U.S. and the U.N., it will be all the more difficult to argue for turning this over in one form or another to the U.N. But doing so would be good for us, good for Iraq, and good for the U.N.

It would be good for the U.S. because we will need help. We will need NGOs [nongovernmental organizations] operating, and they are less likely to operate as an arm of the American government, and more likely to do so under U.N. auspices. U.N. cover will also help bring others in to undertake some of the tasks that America doesn't do particularly well.

It would be good for Iraq, because it will help to mitigate fears that this is a colonial land grab. It will reduce the attraction of Iraqi Islamists and others who may seek to undermine new political arrangements.

It would be good for the United Nations, because it will give it an important mission on the heels of recent events which have made the U.N. appear irrelevant.

 
Lets Put The Train Back On Track°.... Iran & Syria

Q. Rachel, do you think the Bush administration could have done a better job in trying to get Security Council backing for the war in Iraq? And does it matter that it did not get that backing?

A. We have seen a diplomatic train wreck.

The French and Germans have been real contributors to it. But I'm going to focus on the U.S. side of things, since that is the question.

The Bush administration came to power with a notion that "if we say it, they will follow." Many in this administration believed that President Clinton did not show resolve and commitment and therefore did not lead the international community. This administration decided to pursue an alternative course. They alienated many around the world, but even worse, they did not build a strategy for bringing along ambivalent partners.

The second problem is that this lack of strategy led them to make policy decisions that have been contrary to alliance building. The doctrine of pre-emption alienated many around the world who we would have liked to have been helpful to us.

The third problem is that they never got "on message." They kept changing what this was about--disarmament, regime change, terrorism, or democracy. You can weave a story together about how all of this fits, but they never did.

Fourth, they never put together a compelling vision about post-conflict Iraq. Many around the world believe we have no idea what we are getting ourselves into, and will leave a mess on Iraq's neighbors' doorsteps when we decide things are too hard, or other problems are more compelling. Only very, very recently did the administration begin talking about post-conflict Iraq, and unfortunately it has been too little too late.

Q. On the question of Iraq after the war, what are some of the geopolitical implications of a war with Iraq? Do you think President Bush is failing to recognize some of these implications? Would an independent Kurdistan be a disaster?

A. The current policy of containment was becoming a disaster. It required the continuation of economic sanctions which targeted the Iraqi middle class and the most innocent and vulnerable in that society. Saddam built palaces while his people had nothing. Sanctions are an immoral policy, and we are right to change it. Unfortunately, lifting sanctions would only have allowed Saddam to continue to build up and threaten us and his neighbors.

Also, the heavy American troop presence that containment required was becoming a liability for us and our partners. It was giving succor to the region's radicals who recruited on the message of Americans in the holy land (Saudi Arabia). Osama bin Laden is the most extreme example.

The United States has been containing not only Iraq, but its neighbors as well. This was a terrible policy.

I bring all this up because it's not a choice between an acceptable policy and another one. The current policy was bad for the U.S., bad for the Iraqis, and bad for the region.

Does George Bush know what he's getting into? If things go well, many of the worst scenarios will be avoided. It will be hard to march in protest in Cairo and Paris if there is dancing in Basra.

But getting Iraq back on its feet will mean an initial commitment to ensuring "law and order," and that requires the United States to use its soldiers to "police and pacify." That is something the president actually campaigned against. I hope the president is committed to this. He is saying the right things, but our half-hearted efforts in Afghanistan make our friends and allies nervous.

Other risks: the story of burning oil fields is very worrisome. Iraqis will need their oil to rebuild. It will be very costly even with Iraq producing oil at full capacity. The estimated cost of reconstruction is between 25 billion and 100 billion dollars. Iraq produces only about 12 billion to 14 billion dollars a year in oil, in current prices.

There are risks about what the neighbors will do. Turkey and Iran must be encouraged to stay out.

There are risks about what the Iraqis will do to each other, given the decades of brutality they have lived through.

These problems are manageable, but it will take skillful diplomacy.

Q. Will Iran view a U.S.-dominated Iraq next door as a serious threat to its national security, thus leading to an acceleration in its plans to obtain nuclear weapons? And do you think it will encourage the Shiites in Basra to break away?

A. By all accounts, Iran has accelerated its nuclear program without the United States sitting in Iraq.

Iran lives in a difficult neighborhood, with Pakistan, India, and Iraq all within striking reach. If Iraq can be effectively disarmed, it should ease some Iranian concerns. That is why Iran has been notably quiet.

The Shiites in Iraq have repeatedly shown themselves to be Iraqi nationals. Saddam was worried they would fight with Iran during the Iran-Iraq war. They didn't. I think the more likely scenario is that the Shi'a will look for fair representation in any new government, not to break away from Iraq.

Q. President Bush last week endorsed the "road map" for an Israeli-Palestinian peace process. How can the world expect peace to occur between Palestinians and Israelis when racial hatred towards Jews is so deeply ingrained in the minds of many Arabs?

And the reverse. Do you think that after the regime change in Iraq, the Bush administration will press Sharon on settlement activity? And if so, why?

A. When the peace process was going well, Qatar opened an economic interest office for the Israeli government. When things were going well, Jordanian-Israeli trade was increasing and Israeli tour guides operated in Jordan. Hardly a racial hatred. I would cast it more as political anger by most, and bigoted anti-semitism by some.

Ideas on both sides have evolved over time, and evolved more quickly when political conditions were more positive.

Some in the administration appear very committed to turning attention to the Israeli-Palestinian crisis. [Deputy Defense Secretary] Paul Wolfowitz has directed his attention to the problem of settlements. Others in the administration do not think there's anything the U.S. can do about what's going on. As with everything else in this administration, there will be a policy battle on the issue that we will all have to watch.

Q. On an Israeli-Palestinian peace, do you expect that pressure will be brought by Washington on Israel to stop the settlements simultaneous with the Palestinians agreeing to halt terror?

A. No. the president has been very clear in his statements of late that once terror stops, then Israel will be pressured to stop the settlements. The administration views these events occurring sequentially.

Q. Does that undercut the "road map" formula?

A. Yes, parts of it anyway.

Q. In your opinion, how should Iraq be ruled after the war ends?

A. In the short term, the United States will have to be in charge, and by short term I mean weeks, perhaps a couple of months. Law and order will have to be ensured and humanitarian assistance provided. The power must be kept on and the water purified. The Iraqi ministries can continue to function (minus the ministers), but we cannot afford a vacuum to form.

However, as quickly as possible, we must design a mechanism by which we hand over political responsibility (although the Iraqis are likely to expect us to continue to ensure security) to the Iraqis. In Afghanistan, a very respected, internationally-recognized figure took the helm, working hand-in-glove with the U.N. This model is a good place to start.

Given the current acrimony between the U.S. and the U.N., it will be all the more difficult to argue for turning this over in one form or another to the U.N. But doing so would be good for us, good for Iraq, and good for the U.N.

It would be good for the U.S. because we will need help. We will need NGOs [nongovernmental organizations] operating, and they are less likely to operate as an arm of the American government, and more likely to do so under U.N. auspices. U.N. cover will also help bring others in to undertake some of the tasks that America doesn't do particularly well.

It would be good for Iraq, because it will help to mitigate fears that this is a colonial land grab. It will reduce the attraction of Iraqi Islamists and others who may seek to undermine new political arrangements.

It would be good for the United Nations, because it will give it an important mission on the heels of recent events which have made the U.N. appear irrelevant.

Archives

Mar 21, 2003   Mar 22, 2003   Mar 23, 2003   Apr 1, 2003   Apr 2, 2003   Apr 4, 2003   Apr 5, 2003   Apr 6, 2003   Apr 9, 2003   Apr 10, 2003   Apr 14, 2003   Apr 15, 2003   Apr 16, 2003   Apr 18, 2003   Apr 22, 2003   Apr 24, 2003   Apr 25, 2003   Apr 27, 2003   Apr 29, 2003   Apr 30, 2003   May 1, 2003   May 3, 2003   May 6, 2003   May 7, 2003   May 15, 2003   May 16, 2003   May 17, 2003   May 18, 2003   May 19, 2003   May 24, 2003   May 28, 2003   May 29, 2003   May 30, 2003   Jun 3, 2003   Jun 5, 2003   Jun 6, 2003   Jun 7, 2003   Jun 9, 2003   Jun 10, 2003   Jun 12, 2003   Jun 16, 2003   Jun 17, 2003   Jun 18, 2003   Jun 19, 2003   Jun 21, 2003   Jun 28, 2003   Jul 8, 2003   Jul 9, 2003   Jul 16, 2003   Jul 20, 2003   Jul 24, 2003   Jul 27, 2003   Jul 31, 2003   Aug 3, 2003   Aug 4, 2003   Aug 18, 2003   Aug 29, 2003   Sep 5, 2003   Sep 20, 2003   Oct 10, 2003   Oct 26, 2003   Feb 13, 2004   Apr 8, 2004   Jul 27, 2004   Aug 12, 2004   Aug 13, 2004   Aug 24, 2004   Sep 15, 2004   Oct 31, 2004   Nov 17, 2004   Dec 2, 2004   Jan 17, 2005   May 14, 2005   Jul 29, 2005   May 18, 2006   Mar 1, 2007   Apr 29, 2007   May 31, 2007   Jun 5, 2007   Jun 22, 2007   Jul 5, 2007   Aug 1, 2007   Sep 2, 2007   Nov 9, 2007   Dec 3, 2007   Jan 5, 2008   Jan 22, 2008   Feb 3, 2008   Jun 7, 2008   Jul 11, 2008   Jul 17, 2008   Jul 19, 2008   Jul 22, 2008   Jul 24, 2008   Jul 29, 2008   Jul 31, 2008   Sep 11, 2008   Sep 24, 2008   Sep 30, 2008   Oct 8, 2008   Oct 29, 2008   Nov 12, 2008   Nov 18, 2008   Nov 25, 2008   Dec 31, 2008   Jan 13, 2009   Mar 9, 2009   Apr 7, 2009   May 8, 2009   Jun 11, 2009   Jul 3, 2009   Aug 3, 2009   Aug 12, 2009   Aug 13, 2009   Aug 14, 2009   Aug 21, 2009   Aug 27, 2009   Sep 2, 2009   Sep 8, 2009   Sep 18, 2009   Sep 25, 2009   Sep 29, 2009   Oct 1, 2009   Oct 5, 2009   Oct 13, 2009   Oct 19, 2009   Nov 11, 2009   Nov 13, 2009   Nov 18, 2009   Nov 19, 2009   Dec 7, 2009   Dec 27, 2009   Jan 1, 2010   Jan 20, 2010   Jan 25, 2010   Jan 29, 2010   Feb 16, 2010   Feb 24, 2010   Feb 26, 2010   Mar 4, 2010   Mar 5, 2010   Mar 6, 2010   Mar 23, 2010   Mar 30, 2010   Apr 6, 2010   Apr 15, 2010   May 5, 2010   Jun 2, 2010   Jun 17, 2010   Jul 10, 2010   Jul 16, 2010   Jul 21, 2010   Aug 4, 2010   Aug 19, 2010   Sep 14, 2010   Nov 11, 2010   Dec 21, 2010   Jan 1, 2011   Jan 13, 2011   Feb 8, 2011   Mar 23, 2011   Apr 29, 2011   May 10, 2011   May 17, 2011   May 19, 2011   May 24, 2011   Jun 1, 2011   Jul 23, 2011   Jul 26, 2011   Aug 10, 2011   Aug 25, 2011   Aug 29, 2011   Aug 31, 2011   Sep 2, 2011   Sep 8, 2011   Sep 26, 2011   Oct 4, 2011   Oct 20, 2011   Oct 25, 2011   Oct 27, 2011   Nov 1, 2011   Nov 3, 2011   Nov 4, 2011   Nov 9, 2011   Nov 17, 2011   Nov 21, 2011   Nov 23, 2011   Nov 30, 2011   Dec 9, 2011   Dec 19, 2011   Dec 21, 2011   Dec 22, 2011   Dec 25, 2011   Dec 30, 2011   Jan 2, 2012   Jan 4, 2012   Jan 5, 2012   Jan 6, 2012   Jan 11, 2012   Jan 12, 2012   Jan 13, 2012   Jan 16, 2012   Jan 21, 2012   Jan 24, 2012   Jan 30, 2012   Jan 31, 2012   Feb 1, 2012   Feb 2, 2012   Feb 3, 2012   Feb 6, 2012   Feb 7, 2012   Feb 9, 2012   Feb 10, 2012   Feb 13, 2012   Feb 14, 2012   Feb 15, 2012   Feb 16, 2012   Feb 17, 2012   Feb 20, 2012   Feb 21, 2012   Feb 23, 2012   Feb 24, 2012   Feb 28, 2012   Feb 29, 2012   Mar 1, 2012   Mar 2, 2012   Mar 5, 2012   Mar 6, 2012   Mar 9, 2012   Mar 12, 2012   Mar 13, 2012   Mar 14, 2012   Mar 15, 2012   Mar 16, 2012   Mar 17, 2012   Mar 20, 2012   Mar 21, 2012   Mar 22, 2012   Mar 23, 2012   Mar 26, 2012   Mar 28, 2012   Mar 29, 2012   Mar 30, 2012   Apr 2, 2012   Apr 3, 2012   Apr 4, 2012   Apr 9, 2012   Apr 10, 2012   Apr 11, 2012   Apr 12, 2012   Apr 13, 2012   Apr 16, 2012   Apr 17, 2012   Apr 18, 2012   Apr 19, 2012   Apr 20, 2012   Apr 23, 2012   Apr 24, 2012   Apr 25, 2012   Apr 26, 2012   Apr 27, 2012   Apr 30, 2012   May 2, 2012   May 3, 2012   May 4, 2012   May 7, 2012   May 8, 2012   May 9, 2012   May 10, 2012   May 11, 2012   May 14, 2012   May 15, 2012   May 16, 2012   May 17, 2012   May 18, 2012   May 22, 2012   May 23, 2012   May 24, 2012   May 25, 2012   Jun 4, 2012   Jun 5, 2012   Jun 7, 2012   Jun 8, 2012   Jun 9, 2012   Jun 11, 2012   Jun 12, 2012   Jun 14, 2012   Jun 15, 2012   Jun 22, 2012   Jun 25, 2012   Jun 26, 2012   Jun 28, 2012   Jun 29, 2012   Jul 3, 2012   Jul 5, 2012   Jul 6, 2012   Jul 9, 2012   Jul 10, 2012   Jul 11, 2012   Jul 12, 2012   Jul 13, 2012   Jul 19, 2012   Jul 23, 2012   Jul 25, 2012   Jul 27, 2012   Jul 28, 2012   Jul 30, 2012   Jul 31, 2012   Aug 1, 2012   Aug 3, 2012   Aug 6, 2012   Aug 8, 2012   Aug 9, 2012   Aug 10, 2012   Aug 13, 2012   Aug 14, 2012   Aug 15, 2012   Aug 16, 2012   Aug 21, 2012   Aug 22, 2012   Aug 23, 2012   Aug 24, 2012   Aug 27, 2012   Aug 28, 2012   Aug 29, 2012   Aug 30, 2012   Aug 31, 2012   Sep 3, 2012   Sep 4, 2012   Sep 5, 2012   Sep 6, 2012   Sep 7, 2012   Sep 10, 2012   Sep 11, 2012   Sep 13, 2012   Sep 14, 2012   Sep 18, 2012   Sep 19, 2012   Sep 21, 2012   Sep 25, 2012   Sep 26, 2012   Sep 27, 2012   Sep 28, 2012   Oct 1, 2012   Oct 2, 2012   Oct 3, 2012   Oct 4, 2012   Oct 5, 2012   Oct 8, 2012   Oct 9, 2012   Oct 11, 2012   Oct 16, 2012   Oct 17, 2012   Oct 19, 2012   Oct 25, 2012   Oct 30, 2012   Oct 31, 2012   Nov 1, 2012   Nov 2, 2012   Nov 6, 2012   Nov 7, 2012   Nov 8, 2012   Nov 13, 2012   Nov 15, 2012   Nov 16, 2012   Nov 20, 2012   Nov 21, 2012   Nov 22, 2012   Nov 23, 2012   Nov 27, 2012   Nov 28, 2012   Dec 3, 2012   Dec 7, 2012   Dec 10, 2012   Dec 12, 2012   Dec 17, 2012   Dec 19, 2012   Dec 20, 2012   Dec 21, 2012   Dec 25, 2012   Dec 28, 2012   Dec 29, 2012   Dec 30, 2012   Jan 2, 2013   Jan 8, 2013   Jan 10, 2013   Jan 11, 2013   Jan 15, 2013   Jan 22, 2013   Jan 28, 2013   Jan 29, 2013   Jan 30, 2013   Jan 31, 2013   Feb 1, 2013   Feb 4, 2013   Feb 7, 2013   Feb 8, 2013   Feb 11, 2013   Feb 12, 2013   Feb 13, 2013   Feb 14, 2013   Feb 15, 2013   Feb 18, 2013   Feb 19, 2013   Feb 20, 2013   Feb 22, 2013   Feb 23, 2013   Feb 25, 2013   Feb 26, 2013   Mar 2, 2013   Mar 4, 2013   Mar 6, 2013   Mar 8, 2013   Mar 11, 2013   Mar 13, 2013   Mar 14, 2013   Mar 18, 2013   Mar 19, 2013   Mar 21, 2013   Mar 22, 2013   Mar 26, 2013   Apr 1, 2013   Apr 2, 2013   Apr 3, 2013   Apr 5, 2013   Apr 9, 2013   Apr 16, 2013   Apr 17, 2013   Apr 23, 2013   Apr 30, 2013   May 3, 2013   May 6, 2013   May 8, 2013   May 10, 2013   May 14, 2013   May 22, 2013   May 24, 2013   May 30, 2013   Jun 7, 2013   Jun 12, 2013   Jun 14, 2013   Jun 17, 2013   Jun 21, 2013   Jun 25, 2013   Jun 27, 2013   Jun 28, 2013   Jun 29, 2013   Jul 2, 2013   Jul 4, 2013   Jul 5, 2013   Jul 6, 2013   Jul 9, 2013   Jul 10, 2013   Jul 15, 2013   Jul 16, 2013   Jul 17, 2013   Jul 18, 2013   Jul 22, 2013   Jul 26, 2013   Jul 29, 2013   Jul 31, 2013   Aug 2, 2013   Aug 5, 2013   Aug 9, 2013   Aug 12, 2013   Aug 13, 2013   Aug 15, 2013   Aug 16, 2013   Aug 20, 2013   Aug 27, 2013   Aug 29, 2013   Sep 10, 2013   Sep 12, 2013   Sep 13, 2013   Sep 20, 2013   Sep 24, 2013   Sep 26, 2013   Sep 27, 2013   Oct 1, 2013   Oct 3, 2013   Oct 4, 2013   Oct 8, 2013   Oct 9, 2013   Oct 11, 2013   Oct 15, 2013   Oct 18, 2013   Oct 23, 2013   Oct 26, 2013   Oct 28, 2013   Oct 29, 2013   Nov 2, 2013   Nov 7, 2013   Nov 8, 2013   Nov 15, 2013   Nov 19, 2013   Nov 23, 2013   Nov 25, 2013   Nov 28, 2013   Nov 30, 2013   Dec 2, 2013   Dec 3, 2013   Dec 4, 2013   Dec 6, 2013   Dec 10, 2013   Dec 11, 2013   Dec 13, 2013   Dec 16, 2013   Dec 20, 2013   Dec 21, 2013   Dec 28, 2013   Dec 30, 2013   Jan 2, 2014   Jan 3, 2014   Jan 7, 2014   Jan 8, 2014   Jan 9, 2014   Jan 10, 2014   Jan 11, 2014   Jan 16, 2014   Jan 18, 2014   Jan 20, 2014   Jan 21, 2014   Jan 22, 2014   Jan 23, 2014   Jan 25, 2014   Jan 27, 2014   Jan 28, 2014   Jan 30, 2014   Feb 4, 2014   Feb 5, 2014   Feb 8, 2014   Feb 10, 2014   Feb 11, 2014   Feb 12, 2014   Feb 13, 2014   Feb 14, 2014   Feb 17, 2014   Feb 18, 2014   Feb 21, 2014   Feb 24, 2014   Feb 25, 2014   Feb 27, 2014   Feb 28, 2014   Mar 3, 2014   Mar 10, 2014   Mar 11, 2014   Mar 12, 2014   Mar 13, 2014   Mar 15, 2014   Mar 17, 2014   Mar 19, 2014   Mar 20, 2014   Mar 21, 2014   Apr 1, 2014   Apr 3, 2014   Apr 7, 2014   Apr 10, 2014   Apr 14, 2014   Apr 16, 2014   Apr 22, 2014   Apr 23, 2014   Apr 24, 2014   Apr 29, 2014   May 3, 2014   May 5, 2014   May 7, 2014   May 8, 2014   May 10, 2014   May 12, 2014   May 14, 2014   May 15, 2014   May 16, 2014   May 20, 2014   May 21, 2014   May 23, 2014   May 26, 2014   May 29, 2014   May 31, 2014   Jun 3, 2014   Jun 5, 2014   Jun 9, 2014   Jun 10, 2014   Jun 16, 2014   Jun 17, 2014   Jun 20, 2014   Jun 21, 2014   Jun 24, 2014   Jun 25, 2014   Jun 30, 2014   Jul 2, 2014   Jul 3, 2014   Jul 5, 2014   Jul 7, 2014   Jul 8, 2014   Jul 9, 2014   Jul 10, 2014   Jul 11, 2014   Jul 12, 2014   Jul 15, 2014   Jul 17, 2014   Jul 19, 2014   Jul 21, 2014   Jul 22, 2014   Jul 23, 2014   Jul 26, 2014   Jul 29, 2014   Aug 1, 2014   Aug 4, 2014   Aug 12, 2014   Aug 15, 2014   Aug 22, 2014   Aug 29, 2014   Sep 5, 2014   Sep 9, 2014   Sep 11, 2014   Sep 13, 2014   Sep 16, 2014   Sep 18, 2014   Sep 29, 2014   Sep 30, 2014   Oct 1, 2014   Oct 2, 2014   Oct 4, 2014   Oct 6, 2014   Oct 15, 2014   Oct 16, 2014   Oct 17, 2014   Oct 21, 2014   Oct 23, 2014   Oct 25, 2014   Oct 27, 2014   Oct 29, 2014   Nov 6, 2014   Nov 11, 2014   Nov 13, 2014   Nov 18, 2014   Nov 20, 2014   Nov 21, 2014   Nov 22, 2014   Nov 25, 2014   Dec 1, 2014   Dec 3, 2014   Dec 11, 2014   Dec 17, 2014   Jan 15, 2015   Jan 16, 2015   Jan 19, 2015   Jan 28, 2015   Jan 30, 2015   Feb 2, 2015   Feb 3, 2015   Feb 6, 2015   Feb 10, 2015   Feb 11, 2015   Feb 14, 2015   Feb 17, 2015   Feb 18, 2015   Feb 23, 2015   Feb 25, 2015   Feb 28, 2015   Mar 2, 2015   Mar 6, 2015   Mar 7, 2015   Mar 9, 2015   Mar 10, 2015   Mar 17, 2015   Mar 19, 2015   Mar 30, 2015   Apr 4, 2015   Apr 7, 2015   Apr 11, 2015   Apr 14, 2015   Apr 17, 2015   Apr 18, 2015   Apr 21, 2015   Apr 29, 2015   May 2, 2015   May 4, 2015   May 6, 2015   May 12, 2015   May 14, 2015   May 16, 2015   May 20, 2015   May 23, 2015   May 26, 2015   May 27, 2015   May 30, 2015   Jun 1, 2015   Jun 2, 2015   Jun 9, 2015   Jun 16, 2015   Jun 20, 2015   Jun 26, 2015   Jul 1, 2015   Jul 2, 2015   Jul 4, 2015   Jul 6, 2015   Jul 8, 2015   Jul 10, 2015   Jul 11, 2015   Jul 16, 2015   Jul 18, 2015   Jul 23, 2015   Jul 25, 2015   Jul 29, 2015   Aug 1, 2015   Aug 3, 2015   Aug 6, 2015   Aug 10, 2015   Aug 18, 2015   Aug 21, 2015   Aug 24, 2015   Aug 31, 2015   Sep 3, 2015   Sep 9, 2015   Sep 15, 2015   Sep 17, 2015   Sep 21, 2015   Sep 22, 2015   Sep 25, 2015   Sep 28, 2015   Sep 29, 2015   Sep 30, 2015   Oct 2, 2015   Oct 6, 2015   Oct 9, 2015   Oct 10, 2015   Oct 17, 2015   Oct 20, 2015   Oct 26, 2015   Oct 27, 2015   Oct 28, 2015   Oct 31, 2015   Nov 7, 2015   Nov 14, 2015   Nov 28, 2015   Dec 10, 2015   Dec 15, 2015   Jan 19, 2016   Feb 3, 2016   Feb 16, 2016   Feb 23, 2016   Feb 26, 2016   Mar 9, 2016   Mar 22, 2016   Apr 16, 2016   Apr 22, 2016   May 4, 2016   May 7, 2016   May 8, 2016   May 19, 2016   May 31, 2016   Jun 4, 2016   Jun 11, 2016   Jun 16, 2016   Jun 28, 2016   Jul 4, 2016   Jul 11, 2016   Jul 16, 2016   Jul 17, 2016   Jul 21, 2016   Jul 25, 2016   Jul 31, 2016   Aug 5, 2016   Aug 17, 2016   Aug 27, 2016   Sep 2, 2016   Sep 13, 2016   Sep 22, 2016   Sep 27, 2016   Oct 4, 2016   Oct 8, 2016   Oct 25, 2016   Nov 17, 2016   Nov 28, 2016   Dec 9, 2016   Dec 14, 2016   Dec 31, 2016   Jan 26, 2017   Feb 10, 2017   Feb 14, 2017   Feb 23, 2017   Feb 28, 2017   Mar 2, 2017   Mar 7, 2017   Mar 16, 2017   Mar 18, 2017   Mar 31, 2017   Apr 1, 2017   Apr 10, 2017   Apr 15, 2017   Apr 18, 2017  

This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?

Subscribe to Posts [Atom]