Flash Gordon Left Me The Keys

The TEST OF ALL MOTHERS

Friday, May 16, 2003

 
Put another penny on the tracks Joey!
 
Cannon system could be headed for Elgin
A decision expected this week by the Pentagon could lead to a next-generation artillery system being built in Elgin.

The town of about 1,000 had been selected by defense contractor United Defense as the future production home of the Army's Crusader system, but that system was scrapped by the Bush administration in favor of a lighter, leaner cannon.

United Defense is now trying to adapt the technology gained from its Crusader program to that of a long-range, non-line-of-sight cannon system that is part of the Pentagon's Future Combat Systems.

A decision on the FCS program is expected Wednesday at a defense acquisition board meeting. If the program is approved, Elgin will be on its way toward becoming the site for building and testing the cannon.

"We fully expect the defense acquisition board to make the approval," United Defense spokesman Jeff Van Keuren told The Daily Oklahoman. "And we fully anticipate coming to Elgin where we would assemble and test the new system."

United Defense, based in Arlington, Va., began developing the cannon in August after winning a $27 million contract with the U.S. Army. Approval of the FCS program means the contractor would continue developing the artillery system in October.

Congress already has set aside $368.5 million for fiscal 2003, said U.S. Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla., and Ryan Thompson, a spokesman for Sen. Jim Inhofe, R-Okla. Congress will have to secure additional money for the program each year.

"That money is already guaranteed for this year," Cole said. "But if there is one thing I've learned since coming to Washington, it is if you're sitting on a pot of money, you had better treat it as though you're shepherding a wagon across the badlands ... We'll be riding shotgun on this one."

Van Keuren said construction of the plant would begin in spring 2006. The United Defense plant is projected to produce 150 jobs and an annual payroll of between $5 million and $6 million, according to an economic impact study completed for Elgin in February. The study also projected that the plant and related businesses would bring $32 million in construction to the area.

United Defense also projects an additional "200 to 300 jobs" from companies that will support the artillery system, Van Keuren said.

Some military experts question whether a heavy gun can be mounted on a light armored vehicle that weighs less than 20 tons. The system must be operational by 2010.

"I think it's a really big leap from the Crusader," said John Pike, a military defense analyst who heads GlobalSecurity.org, a military research group. "When one stops to think about all of the FCS projects, this one definitely has the highest degree of technological risks. This is the one that is going to take the longest time to implement.

"They're going to take a 20-ton platform and mount a heavy cannon. Think about how it will absorb the recoil. How big a bullet can they shoot?"

These are questions United Defense plans to answer in September when the system undergoes its first round of demonstrations, Van Keuren said.

"That will obviously be a very important time for us," Van Keuren said. "That's why we're really looking forward to that demonstration - to show that we do have the technology."


 
'Land Warrior' technology is the next battlefield edge
Military men watch movies like John Wayne's "Sands of Iwo Jima" for inspiration. But as the work of Mountain View-based Pemstar Pacific Consultants progresses on the Army's futuristic Land Warrior system, new recruits may start finding movies like "Robocop" and "Terminator" equally relevant.

The cyborg-like Land Warrior program represents the Army's attempt to plug individual infantrymen into the same technology that pilots and submarine captains use in battle. It means incorporating functions like night vision, radio, protective clothing, navigation and positioning systems, weapons guidance and other sensors and gadgets into one piece of equipment that soldiers wear like a uniform.

If all goes well, soldiers may someday become half-man, half-machine.

"What we're trying to achieve is the same level of overmatched capability that we have in the air, on the ground," said Bret Herscher, president and founder of Pemstar Pacific Consultants. "No air force would ever fly against the U.S. Air Force -- not even our allies, like the British."

Pacific Consultants, a division of Minnesota-based contract manufacturer Pemstar, grosses about $25 million a year, according to the company, by performing high-level instrument design. Founded in 1995, it employs 90 engineers in Mountain View, most of whom hold Ph.D.s.

Typical projects involve designing a heart stent for a big pharmaceutical company or an electronic router for a telecom company. Four years ago, the company branched into the defense business when the Army came to Silicon Valley to update Land Warrior after the 40-pound prototype, produced by Raytheon, proved to be too bulky.

Menlo Park-based Exponent, a scientific consulting company, won the contract and brought in Pacific Consultants because of its experience designing wireless equipment. Now defense giant General Dynamics holds the contract for Land Warrior, which was just re-upped this year for $60 million. Pacific Consultants' role has increased so that they have a hand in updating all of Land Warrior's hardware, though Herscher said he can not say how much his company's piece of the contract is worth.

Silicon Valley ingenuity has always kept businesses, with their networks and computers, running smoothly. As the Army has gotten more sophisticated about using computing power in battle, it is also starting to hire private companies to upgrade its systems rather than rely on in-house technology.

"By using off-the-shelf technology we saved the Army money, as they didn't have to reinvent the wheel,"said Angela Meyer, a vice president at Exponent, which first brought the project to Silicon Valley. In fact, the system itself is estimated to only cost about $30,000 per person, down from initial estimates of $60,000. The weight has fallen from 40 pounds to around 10 pounds.

While Raytheon spent over $100 million during the 1990s working on the first Land Warrior system, the Silicon Valley team produced its first prototype in six months for $2 million, using Windows software and computer chips anyone can buy at Radio Shack or Fry's Electronics.

Military decisions to buy existing technology is a controversial, decade-old trend, says John Pike, the director of GlobalSecurity.org, a defense policy group in Virginia. The military on the one hand sees the benefits of private industry's technology but worries it has less control over what gets developed.

Despite all the excitement and money spent, the Land Warrior remains in prototype form. Pacific Consultants' Herscher said it may be more than a year before soldiers can use it in battle.

The Army also has not been able to test other aspects of the "digitized infantry" programs in real life. The cutting-edge 4th Mechanized Infantry entered Iraq from Kuwait in early April, but the war ended before it saw real action, said Pike.

If it had, it would have been able to try out Force XXI technology, which uses computers to digitally link together tanks, helicopters and personnel carriers, so they are all on the same digital wavelength, as Pike described it.

If all goes well with the work of Pacific Consultants on Land Warrior, combat infantrymen will be on the same wavelength, too.


 
U.S. to Rely More on Private Companies' Satellite Images (Home Pictures)

President Bush is ordering federal agencies to rely much more heavily on private satellite companies to provide images from space, a significant shift from current policy, administration officials said today.

The new policy seeks to limit the government's own network of satellites to the most sensitive, high-priority assignments and use private vendors to meet relatively routine tasks "to the maximum practical extent," officials said. The shift is seen as an effort both to bolster the position of American satellite companies in the global marketplace and, in the long term, to save money.

The White House is expected to announce the new policy on Tuesday after a review that began late last year.

The White House's new policy will replace a nine-year-old presidential directive signed in 1994 by President Bill Clinton, which Bush administration officials said had become largely outdated because of advances in private satellite technology.

"This is a very significant change," a senior administration official said today. "We're essentially saying that where the commercial industry can provide what we need, have at it."

But the shift carries security risks.

"The potential bad news," the senior official said, is that the images collected by private vendors "are also available to our adversaries." The government will reserve the right to restrict the sale of commercial data by American companies to anyone deemed to pose a national security risk, the official said.

The government currently has more than a half-dozen high-resolution satellites in orbit to provide imagery and photos for uses as varied as military and intelligence operations, map-making and climate control, officials said. Two private American companies operate high-resolution satellites, and a third is expected to launch one later this year, competing with other companies overseas.

As the quality of private satellite resolution has improved in recent years, the government has come to rely more heavily on them, but with that trend has come bureaucratic resistance and occasional in-fighting.

Last year, the director of central intelligence, George J. Tenet, ordered American intelligence agencies to expand their use of private satellites after Air Force officials complained that bureaucratic tangles prevented them from using commercial images of Afghanistan to aid in bombing missions in the war against the Taliban. As a result, Air Force pilots had to use outdated Russian maps during the early stages of the war.

President Bush's new policy directive moves the federal government even further in the direction of commercial satellites, expanding Mr. Tenet's order to the federal government as a whole. More than a dozen departments and agencies, including the Pentagon, the State Department, the Department of Homeland Security, the Transportation Department, and the C.I.A., fall under the new order, officials said.

"A year ago, we had Tenet saying this is what we want to do, and now we have the president saying this is national policy," said John Pike, director of GlobalSecurity.org and a specialist in satellite technology.

"This is basically long overdue," Mr. Pike said in an interview. "The benefits of buying commercial when it is possible have been evident for a long time."

While budget figures on satellite intelligence-gathering are tightly held, the government is believed to spend several billion dollars a year to operate its own high-resolution satellites, dwarfing what it spends to buy from private vendors, Mr. Pike said. He and government officials said they could not predict just how much those numbers would change under the new policy.

Officials from the private satellite industry have been meeting with administration officials in recent months about the issue and are eagerly awaiting the new policy directive, said Mark Brender, vice president for Space Imaging, a private company near Denver that maintains a satellite 423 miles in orbit.

"We anticipate a breakthrough policy that is pro-business, that is positive and that enables commercial industry to build and launch the best technology in order to meet the government's appetite for high-resolution commercial satellites," Mr. Brender said in an interview.

 
Va. Company's Saudi Ties Go Back 25 Years (milo)

Despite warnings of impending terror acts, the suicide bombers in Riyadh met little resistance when they attacked a housing complex that included Americans who have been training Saudi Arabian national guardsmen.

It was the second time in eight years that the Saudi business interests of Fairfax, Va.-based Vinnell Corp. have come under terrorist attack.

On Monday night, it took the bombers 30 seconds to a minute to get through an iron gate, drive up to the building and detonate explosives, said a senior administration official on the plane of Secretary of State Colin Powell. Seventy Americans employed by Vinnell lived in the building, but 50 of them were away on a training exercise.

After killing the sentries, the bombers pushed the button that opened the iron gate to the compound.

``They had to know where the switches were,'' said the official, suggesting the terrorists had inside information.

A November 1995 car bomb blast destroyed a building in the Saudi capital that was headquarters for the U.S. Army training program in which Vinnell was deeply involved.

A former CIA officer said the national guard, the group being trained by Vinnell, was protecting the complex housing the Vinnell employees.

``Certainly there is vulnerability when it comes to suicide bombers, but nevertheless these are the people who are training the national guard, and the question is, `Why wasn't there better security?''' said Vincent Cannistraro, former counterterrorism operations chief at the CIA.

The Saudi national guard protects the ruling monarchy and is the Saudi equivalent to the Republican Guard of Saddam Hussein, said John Pike, director of Globalsecurity.org, a defense policy group. Separate from the regular Saudi army, the guard is the descendant of the army that orginally helped conquer the Saudi Arabian peninsula for the House of Saud, the ruling monarchy.

Saudi guards were protecting the complex at a time when there was a heightened state of alert for the country. The State Department announced May 1 that terrorist groups might be in the final phases of planning attacks against U.S. interests in Saudi Arabia.

Just a day before the deadly assault in the Saudi capital, an al-Qaida operative wrote in an e-mail to a London-based magazine that al-Qaida had set up ``martyrdom'' squads in Saudi Arabia to launch what he described as a ``guerrilla war'' on Saudi Arabia's leaders and the United States.

In the 1995 terror attack involving Vinnell, a car bombing that killed five Americans, Saudi Arabia obtained confessions from four Saudis and beheaded them before FBI agents were allowed to question them.

Vinnell was awarded its first training contract in Saudi Arabia, for $77 million, in 1975.

The work grew in size and scope over the years to the current multiyear effort worth more than $800 million to Vinnell and involving more than 1,000 employees plus almost 300 U.S. government personnel training the Royal Saudi Air Force, Saudi land forces and other elements of the Saudi military.

The training program, financed by the Saudi government and run by the U.S. Army Materiel Command, is one of numerous Pentagon efforts to make the Saudi air and land forces more capable of defending the oil-rich kingdom against Iraq or other potential enemies.

The projects were accelerated after the 1991 Persian Gulf War.

A subsidiary of defense giant Northrop Grumman, Vinnell advertises for ex-soldiers able to train the Saudis in battalion operations, the Bradley fighting vehicle, anti-tank weapons and physical security.

On its Web site, the company promotes itself as ``a recognized leader in facilities operation and maintenance, military training, educational and vocational training and logistics support in the United States and overseas.''

Vinnell also has operated eight Job Corps centers across the United States under contracts with the Labor Department.

The company took corrective steps when an audit in 2001 found $1.5 million in cost overruns by Vinnell at its Detroit Job Corps centers.

Founded in 1931, the firm began as a construction company that prospered in the construction of military bases during World War II and during the war in Vietnam.


 
US company has long history (disgruntle employees) with Saudis

Vinnell Corp., the American company whose employees were killed Monday by terrorists in Saudi Arabia, has been a key link between the US and Saudi governments, providing retired US military officials to train the elite armed forces that protect the royal family. That link appears to have led the Virginia-based company to be a target of Al Qaeda terrorists, analysts said.

Vinnell has a sometimes controversial history with the Saudis. It includes a congressional investigation of its activities, questions about whether it has ties to the CIA, and past links to President Bush and his father, President George H. W. Bush.

''They hit Vinnell as opposed to McDonald's. It has certainly been a centerpiece of the US-Saudi relationship for a very long time,'' said John Pike, a defense analyst at Globalsecurity.org. ''It is absolutely at the core of the legitimacy of the monarchy and the symbiotic relationship between these two countries.''

Since 1975, Vinnell has trained the Saudi National Guard, which is far more prominent than the US National Guard. The Saudi guard is overseen by Crown Prince Abdullah bin Abdul Aziz and is considered by some analysts to be the most effective armed force in Saudi Arabia.

Judith Kipper, a Middle East analyst at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, said: ''The National Guard have the biggest group of Americans working for them of all the official Saudi things. This is a very big job for Vinnell. It is not just being a subcontractor to build something.''

Nine employees of Vinnell were killed Monday night by terrorists with suspected links to Al Qaeda. The attackers, using a car bomb, crashed into a company housing complex and blew up a building.

The Washington Post reported today that Vinnell and US officials said they had no plans to publicly identify the dead.

A spokesman for the State Department's Bureau of Consular Affairs, Edward Dickens, cited ''privacy laws'' and said the company had asked that the names not be released. A Vinnell spokesman, Jay McCaffrey, said the company had made such a request.

The newspaper identified three victims: Obadiah Y. Abdullah, a former Army sergeant with a wife and daughter in Colorado Springs; Clifford Lawson, 46, a retired Army staff sergeant, whose wife, Grace, lives in Atlanta; and Todd Bair, 37, a Lake Wales, Fla., native who retired from the Army a year ago this month.

In 1995, a car bombing at a building shared by Vinnell and the National Guard, according to news accounts from the time, killed five Americans, but none of them were Vinnell employees.

Vinnell, founded in 1931 and a subsidiary of Northrop Grumman, operates in Saudi Arabia under a contract from the US Department of Defense that is managed by the US Army Materiel Command, according to Janis Lamar a spokeswoman for Vinnell. The company's latest four-year contract, effective in 1999, is worth $159 million, she said.

From the beginning of the arrangement in Saudi Arabia, the company's closeness to the Pentagon has caused controversy, according to a book published this year, ''The Iron Triangle: Inside the Secret World of the Carlyle Group.''

The title of the book, written by Dan Briody, refers to the Carlyle Group, which owned Vinnell from 1992 to 1997 and is well-known for its employment of former top US government officials.

Vinnell began its Saudi work in 1975 when it received a $77 million contract to train the national guard.

A congressional investigation was launched into whether Vinnell was performing mercenary work for the Saudis and a clause, later dropped from the initial contract, that forbade the employment of Jews, the book said.

Company officials denied doing mercenary work. The book also quotes an unnamed Vinnell executive as saying that Vinnell ''had been a cover for the CIA for decades.''


 
dhs
 
JetLiners Continue to be Great Attack Vehicle on the ground or in the sky...Homeland Security to look for anti-missile devices for airliners
High-tech companies will be asked to propose ways to protect commercial planes from shoulder-fired missiles, lawmakers said Thursday.

The Homeland Security Department also will ask two companies to build prototype devices, they said.

"This is a real breakthrough," said Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., who is co-sponsoring a bill to equip 6,800 U.S. airliners with some form of anti-missile device. The cost is estimated at $10 billion.

Military aircraft use anti-missile technology, but the cost is high and the reliability open to debate. Still, since last fall's unsuccessful missile attack on an Israeli passenger jet in Africa, lawmakers and safety advocates have been pressing the government to look into the technology.

The federal study was ordered in April by Congress as part of the spending plan for the war in Iraq.

Homeland Security spokesman Brian Roehrkasse did not release any details from it but said "the report provides a plan to determine if a viable technology exists to be deployed on commercial aircraft."

Schumer, Sen. Barbara Boxer, D-Calif., and Rep. Steve Israel, D-N.Y., said they were briefed on the study, and they held a news conference to discuss the findings.

Under their bill, the government would pay to retrofit commercial airliners now in the fleet, but would require the airlines to pay for the devices, which cost $1 million each, on new aircraft, Schumer said.

U.S. airlines, most of which are in financial trouble, say the government should pay all costs related to the devices if it is determined they should be placed on commercial planes.

"Aviation security is a national defense function," said Debby McElroy, president of the Regional Airline Association.

The head of the worldwide organization that represents U.S. and foreign-owned airlines said the legislation is well-intended but ineffective.

"It would be prohibitively expensive for states to underwrite and very difficult for governments to stay ahead of technologies which continually churn out new instruments of war," said Giovanni Bisignani, chief executive of the International Air Transport Association.

John Pike, director of Globalsecurity.org, a defense policy group, said infrared devices used to protect Air Force cargo planes from shoulder-fired missiles could be used on civilian aircraft.

They are not as effective against the latest generation of more accurate missiles, but a new generation of laser-guided anti-missile devices is in the works, Pike said.

Pike believes all 10,000 commercial passenger planes in the world need to be armed with the devices to reduce the threat to Americans.

Last November, terrorists fired two missiles that just missed an Israeli charter plane after it took off from Mombasa, Kenya. Officials believe al-Qaida launched the attack, which coincided with a bomb blast at a nearby hotel.

El Al, the Israeli airline, is believed to have anti-missile technology on its passenger aircraft.

The State Department on Wednesday told Americans to defer nonessential travel to Kenya because of indications of terrorist threats against U.S. and Western interests, including commercial planes.

Hundreds and perhaps thousands of Soviet-style SA-7s - heat-seeking rockets that can hit low-flying aircraft within 3 miles - are said to be available on the worldwide arms market for as little as several thousand dollars.



 
today is the 1st day of another day of thundering on the net.

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Sep 5, 2014   Sep 9, 2014   Sep 11, 2014   Sep 13, 2014   Sep 16, 2014   Sep 18, 2014   Sep 29, 2014   Sep 30, 2014   Oct 1, 2014   Oct 2, 2014   Oct 4, 2014   Oct 6, 2014   Oct 15, 2014   Oct 16, 2014   Oct 17, 2014   Oct 21, 2014   Oct 23, 2014   Oct 25, 2014   Oct 27, 2014   Oct 29, 2014   Nov 6, 2014   Nov 11, 2014   Nov 13, 2014   Nov 18, 2014   Nov 20, 2014   Nov 21, 2014   Nov 22, 2014   Nov 25, 2014   Dec 1, 2014   Dec 3, 2014   Dec 11, 2014   Dec 17, 2014   Jan 15, 2015   Jan 16, 2015   Jan 19, 2015   Jan 28, 2015   Jan 30, 2015   Feb 2, 2015   Feb 3, 2015   Feb 6, 2015   Feb 10, 2015   Feb 11, 2015   Feb 14, 2015   Feb 17, 2015   Feb 18, 2015   Feb 23, 2015   Feb 25, 2015   Feb 28, 2015   Mar 2, 2015   Mar 6, 2015   Mar 7, 2015   Mar 9, 2015   Mar 10, 2015   Mar 17, 2015   Mar 19, 2015   Mar 30, 2015   Apr 4, 2015   Apr 7, 2015   Apr 11, 2015   Apr 14, 2015   Apr 17, 2015   Apr 18, 2015   Apr 21, 2015   Apr 29, 2015   May 2, 2015   May 4, 2015   May 6, 2015   May 12, 2015   May 14, 2015   May 16, 2015   May 20, 2015   May 23, 2015   May 26, 2015   May 27, 2015   May 30, 2015   Jun 1, 2015   Jun 2, 2015   Jun 9, 2015   Jun 16, 2015   Jun 20, 2015   Jun 26, 2015   Jul 1, 2015   Jul 2, 2015   Jul 4, 2015   Jul 6, 2015   Jul 8, 2015   Jul 10, 2015   Jul 11, 2015   Jul 16, 2015   Jul 18, 2015   Jul 23, 2015   Jul 25, 2015   Jul 29, 2015   Aug 1, 2015   Aug 3, 2015   Aug 6, 2015   Aug 10, 2015   Aug 18, 2015   Aug 21, 2015   Aug 24, 2015   Aug 31, 2015   Sep 3, 2015   Sep 9, 2015   Sep 15, 2015   Sep 17, 2015   Sep 21, 2015   Sep 22, 2015   Sep 25, 2015   Sep 28, 2015   Sep 29, 2015   Sep 30, 2015   Oct 2, 2015   Oct 6, 2015   Oct 9, 2015   Oct 10, 2015   Oct 17, 2015   Oct 20, 2015   Oct 26, 2015   Oct 27, 2015   Oct 28, 2015   Oct 31, 2015   Nov 7, 2015   Nov 14, 2015   Nov 28, 2015   Dec 10, 2015   Dec 15, 2015   Jan 19, 2016   Feb 3, 2016   Feb 16, 2016   Feb 23, 2016   Feb 26, 2016   Mar 9, 2016   Mar 22, 2016   Apr 16, 2016   Apr 22, 2016   May 4, 2016   May 7, 2016   May 8, 2016   May 19, 2016   May 31, 2016   Jun 4, 2016   Jun 11, 2016   Jun 16, 2016   Jun 28, 2016   Jul 4, 2016   Jul 11, 2016   Jul 16, 2016   Jul 17, 2016   Jul 21, 2016   Jul 25, 2016   Jul 31, 2016   Aug 5, 2016   Aug 17, 2016   Aug 27, 2016   Sep 2, 2016   Sep 13, 2016   Sep 22, 2016   Sep 27, 2016   Oct 4, 2016   Oct 8, 2016   Oct 25, 2016   Nov 17, 2016   Nov 28, 2016   Dec 9, 2016   Dec 14, 2016   Dec 31, 2016   Jan 26, 2017   Feb 10, 2017   Feb 14, 2017   Feb 23, 2017   Feb 28, 2017   Mar 2, 2017   Mar 7, 2017   Mar 16, 2017   Mar 18, 2017   Mar 31, 2017   Apr 1, 2017   Apr 10, 2017   Apr 15, 2017   Apr 18, 2017   May 4, 2017   May 12, 2017   May 16, 2017   May 19, 2017   May 27, 2017   Jun 2, 2017   Jun 9, 2017   Jun 12, 2017   Jun 15, 2017   Jun 23, 2017   Jun 24, 2017   Jul 6, 2017   Jul 11, 2017   Jul 12, 2017   Jul 18, 2017   Jul 26, 2017   Aug 5, 2017   Aug 12, 2017  

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