Flash Gordon Left Me The Keys

The TEST OF ALL MOTHERS

Thursday, July 31, 2003

 
Did Bush cry wolf on Iraq? So what! I had to wait in line for four hours to get gas in 1972-3 on a Friday nights for an entire television season and I believe G.W. did the same. Lets not mention the empty store shelves. Thank you for yelling wolf.

Whoppers of mass deception?: The evidence that Iraq had weapons of mass destruction and ties to al-Qaeda was fragmented at best. But President George W. Bush had a war to sell. Now these gaps in intelligence have become gaps in credibility for his administration
CanWest News Service

In a speech last August, U.S. Vice-President Dick Cheney said he was convinced that Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein "will acquire nuclear weapons fairly soon." Iraq, he continued, was amassing weapons of mass destruction to use "against our friends, against our allies and against us."

Cheney's address kicked off a seven-month campaign by President George W. Bush and his top aides to persuade the United States and the world that Iraq was a gathering threat that could be stopped only by war.

Nearly a year later, that case appears to be coming apart, with some key pieces of evidence in doubt and others disproved outright.

The unaccounted-for chemical and biological weapons that Bush, Cheney, Secretary of State Colin Powell and others cited have yet to be found, and may never be. Nor has evidence turned up of an advanced nuclear-weapons program.

Saddam may not have been an imminent threat to the world at all, but a regional bully whose weapons programs weren't nearly as advanced as widely believed, according to current and former intelligence officials and other analysts.

Critics and even nonpartisan analysts say the White House took what America's spy agencies knew about the Iraqi threat and pushed it to the limits of credibility, and beyond.

The U.S. and Britain presented "worst-case estimates to the public and the UN without sufficient qualification, and ... their intelligence communities came under serious political pressure to make something approaching a worst-case interpretation of the evidence," wrote military analyst Anthony Cordesman of the Washington-based Center for Strategic and International Studies.

Retired Lieutenant General Patrick Hughes, a former director of the Defence Intelligence Agency, said policy-makers have long had a tendency to hype intelligence information. "What we have going on is this proclivity, not just in this administration, by decision-makers to fail to put things in the right context," he said.

Failing to include the caveats included in intelligence reports -- that a piece of evidence might lead to a certain conclusion -- amounted to misleading the public in making the case for the Iraq war, Hughes said. "If you are not sure of it, you have to say that," he said.

"They were definitely making things a little bit clearer than the truth in order to sell the war," said John Pike, who is the director of GlobalSecurity.org, a think-tank in Alexandria, Va. "They were acting like it was an electoral campaign -- you can say all kinds of wild things and whatever it would take to get people to buy the war."

President Bush has rejected postwar criticism from what he derisively called "revisionist historians."

As his defenders point out, bipartisan majorities in the U.S. Congress supported the war. Even European nations that refused to join the fighting argued not with the premise that Saddam was hiding weapons he was banned from having, but with Bush's proposed solution.

Presidential Press Secretary Scott McClellan said Bush's case for confronting Iraq "was based on solid evidence." But it also was based on assumptions about Iraq that government officials presented as certainties after the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

Bush acted not "because we had discovered dramatic new evidence," Defence Secretary Donald Rumsfeld told Congress this month. "We acted because we saw the existing evidence in a new light through the prism of our experience on Sept. 11."

Bush's most potent argument for war was that Saddam might share chemical or biological weapons with al-Qaeda or other terrorist groups to use against the U.S. Right behind that was the contention that Iraq was close to having a nuclear weapon.

Neither has been proved true. Nor has administration claims of ties between Iraq and al-Qaeda, which were disputed by counterterrorism experts even before the war.

The intelligence behind such claims was thin at best, said a former U.S. official who had access to classified material about Iraq. "Normally, you'd credit this to being ambiguous and therefore inconclusive. (In this case) everything was spun," said the official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity.

On March 16, four days before the war began, Cheney made the White House's most alarming claim about Saddam's nuclear weapons program: "We believe he has, in fact, reconstituted nuclear weapons."

That and similar statements went far beyond an October intelligence assessment, known as a National Intelligence Estimate, that said Iraq "probably will have a nuclear weapon during this decade" if left unchecked.

One piece of evidence cited by Bush in his January state of the union address was that Iraq had tried to buy large quantities of uranium ore in Africa.

Documents from the African country of Niger that backed the allegation were known at the time by a wide circle of intelligence and diplomatic personnel to have been forgeries, and the White House has conceded that Bush shouldn't have made the claim.

In making the case against Iraq, Bush and his aides also cited stocks of chemical and biological weapons that UN weapons inspectors knew once existed but were never accounted for. The White House suggested these caches still existed.

None has turned up, and an internal CIA study found that most U.S. intelligence on Iraqi arms dated from before the first UN weapons inspectors left Iraq in 1998.

A Defence Intelligence Agency report last year said there was "no reliable information" on whether Iraq was producing and stockpiling chemical weapons.

- - -

How did all this happen? Beginning last summer, Bush administration officials insisted they had compelling new evidence about Iraq's prohibited weapons programs, and only occasionally acknowledged in public how little they actually knew about the status of Baghdad's chemical, biological or nuclear arms.

Some officials belittled the on-again, off-again United Nations inspections after the Gulf War in 1991, suggesting the inspectors had missed important evidence. "Even as they were conducting the most intrusive system of arms control in history, the inspectors missed a great deal," Cheney said in August, before the inspections resumed.

Last fall, as the debate intensified over whether to have inspectors return to Iraq, senior Bush administration officials continued to suggest the U.S. had new or better intelligence that Iraq's weapons programs were accelerating -- information that the UN lacked.

"After 11 years during which we have tried containment, sanctions, inspections, even selected military action, the end result is that Saddam Hussein still has chemical and biological weapons and is increasing his capabilities to make more," Bush declared in a speech in Cincinnati in October. "And he is moving ever closer to developing a nuclear weapon."

Now, with the failure so far to find prohibited weapons in Iraq, U.S. intelligence officials and senior members of the administration have acknowledged there was little new evidence flowing into U.S. intelligence agencies in the five years since UN inspectors left Iraq, creating an intelligence vacuum.

In recent interviews, intelligence and other officials described the CIA and the White House as essentially blinded after the UN inspectors withdrew from Iraq in 1998. They were left grasping for whatever slivers they could obtain, like unconfirmed reports of attempts to buy uranium, or fragmentary reports about the movements of suspected terrorists.

Richard Kerr, who headed a four-member team of retired CIA officials that reviewed prewar intelligence about Iraq, said analysts at the CIA and other agencies were forced to rely heavily on evidence that was five years old at least.

Intelligence analysts drew heavily "on a base of hard evidence growing out of the lead-up to the first (Gulf) war, the first war itself and then the inspections process," Kerr said. "We had a rich base of information," he said, and, after the inspectors left, "we drew on that earlier base."

"There were pieces of new information, but not a lot of hard information, and so the products that dealt with WMD were based heavily on analysis drawn out of that earlier period," Kerr said, using the shorthand for weapons of mass destruction.

Even so, days before Bush's state of the union address in January, Paul Wolfowitz, the deputy secretary of defence, described the intelligence as not only convincing but up to date.

"It is a case grounded in current intelligence," he told the Council on Foreign Relations in New York, "current intelligence that comes not only from sophisticated overhead satellites and our ability to intercept communications, but from brave people who told us the truth at the risk of their lives. We have that; it is very convincing."

In February, CIA director George Tenet expressed confidence in much of the intelligence about Iraq, saying it "comes to us from credible and reliable sources."

"Much of it is corroborated by multiple sources," Tenet added. "And it is consistent with the pattern of deception and denial exhibited by Saddam Hussein over the past 12 years."

It was Cheney who, in September, was clearest about the fact the U.S. had only incomplete information. But he said that should not deter the country from taking action. It's in the American character, he said, "to say, 'Well, we'll sit down and we'll evaluate the evidence. We'll draw a conclusion.' But we always think in terms that we've got all the evidence. Here, we don't have all the evidence. We have 10 per cent, 20 per cent, 30 per cent. We don't know how much. We know we have a part of the picture. And that part of the picture tells us that (Saddam) is, in fact, actively and aggressively seeking to acquire nuclear weapons."

- - - Within the White House, the intelligence agencies, the Defence and State Departments, the shortage of fresh evidence touched off a struggle.

Officials in Bush's National Security Council and the vice-president's office wanted to present every shred of evidence against Saddam. Those working for Secretary of State Colin Powell, and some analysts in the intelligence agencies, insisted that all the dots must be connected before the U.S. endorsed the evidence as the predicate for war.

This struggle, several officials said, explains the confusion about how the administration assembled its case, and how some evidence could be interpreted differently in public presentations before the war.

An internal CIA review of prewar intelligence on Iraq has found that the evidence collected by the CIA and other intelligence agencies after 1998 was mostly fragmentary and often inconclusive.

In a series of interviews, officials said both the Bush administration and congressional committees were aware of the decline in hard evidence collected on Iraq's weapons programs after 1998.

In part, the officials said, that was a result of the embarrassment of 1991, when it turned out the CIA had greatly underestimated the progress Saddam had made in the nuclear arena.

Cheney often cited that experience as he pressed for firmer conclusions. So has Bush.

Analysts say the cost of overestimating the threat posed by Saddam was minimal, while the cost of underestimating it could have been considerable.

The arguments over evidence spilled into public view during the debate about whether UN inspectors should be sent back to Iraq at all. Cheney had declared in August that returning them to Iraq would be dangerous, that it would create a false sense of security. When inspectors returned in November, senior administration officials were dismissive of their abilities. They insisted the American intelligence community had better information on Iraq's weapons programs than the UN, and would use that data to find Baghdad's weapons after Saddam was toppled.

In hindsight, it is now clear just how dependent the U.S. intelligence community was on the UN inspections process.

The inspections aided intelligence agencies directly, by providing witnesses' accounts from ground level, and indirectly, by prodding the Iraqis and forcing them to try to move and hide people and equipment, activities that American spy satellites and listening stations could monitor. Watching from space as Iraq tried to hide things from the inspectors proved to be invaluable in gauging the scope of the Iraqi weapons efforts, current and former intelligence officials said.

Several current and former intelligence officials said the U.S. did not have any high-level spies in Saddam's inner circle who could provide current information about his weapons programs. That weakness could not be fixed quickly. "You can't decide six months before a war" to try to recruit spies, observed a former military intelligence officer. "It takes years."

According to Kerr, the former CIA analyst, given the history of Iraq's weapons programs, "it would have been hard for analysts to go the other way" and conclude the programs were moribund.

"It would have been very hard for any group of analysts, looking at the situation between 1991 through 1995, to conclude that the WMD programs were not underway," Kerr said. And once the inspectors left, he said, "it was also hard to prove they weren't underway."

- - -

By the time Powell arrived at the CIA on Jan. 31, three days after Bush's state of the union speech, the presentation he was scheduled to make at the UN in just five days was in tatters.

Powell's chief of staff had called his boss the day before to warn that "we can't connect all the dots" in the intelligence on Iraq's weapons programs.

Powell's staff had discovered that statements in intelligence assessments did not always match up with the documentary evidence that Powell had insisted on including in his presentation.

Apart from some satellite photographs of facilities rebuilt after they had been bombed during the Clinton administration in 1998, the only new pieces of evidence that Saddam was reconstituting his nuclear program focused on what he was trying to buy.

While the National Intelligence Estimate clearly stated that Saddam "probably will have a nuclear weapon during this decade," Powell's own intelligence unit, in a dissenting view, said, "the activities we have detected do not, however, add up to a compelling case" that Iraq was pursuing what it called "an integrated and comprehensive approach to acquire nuclear weapons."

So Powell walked a careful path, focusing on Iraq's acquisition efforts for centrifuge parts, needed to turn the dross of uranium into the gold of nuclear fuel. But when discussing, for example, the aluminum tubes Iraq had ordered in violation of UN penalties, he did not go as far as National Security Advisor Condoleezza Rice, who said in September the equipment was "only really suited for nuclear weapons programs, centrifuge programs."

Powell, at the UN, acknowledged that the findings about the tubes was disputed. But he did not quote his own intelligence unit, which in that same dissent in the National Intelligence Estimate wrote that it "considers it far more likely that the tubes are intended for another purpose, most likely the production of artillery rockets."

Curiously, as he prepared for his presentation, Powell rejected advice that he hold up such a tube during his speech. Asked about that decision in a recent interview, he joked that the tube would block his face, and then said, "Why hold up the most controversial thing in the pitch?"

Similarly, Powell was more cautious than Bush in describing Saddam's meetings with what the president, in his Cincinnati speech, had called Iraq's "nuclear mujahedeen." Powell was urged by some in the administration to cite those meetings, and to illustrate it with a picture of one of the sessions.

"Now tell me who these guys are," Powell asked a few nights before his presentation, when the CIA showed him the picture, a participant in the conversation recalled.

"Oh, we're quite sure this is his nuclear crowd," came the response. "How do you know?" Powell pressed. "Prove it. Who are they?" No one could answer the question.

"There were a lot of cigars lit," Powell recalled, referring to the evidence. "I didn't want any going off in my face or the president's face."

The CIA also had scant new evidence about links between Iraq and al-Qaeda, but specialists began working on the issue under the direction of Douglas Feith, undersecretary of defence for policy. These analysts did not develop any new intelligence data, but looked at existing intelligence reports for possible links between Iraq and terrorists that they felt might have been overlooked or undervalued.

- - -

This Office of Special Plans, essentially Rumsfeld's own intelligence unit at the Pentagon, may turn out to be one of the more controversial agencies in the lead-up to the war. With its own intelligence collectors and analysts scrutinizing information on Iraq, it may have prodded staff to "hype" intelligence for evidence the administration wanted, say officials and experts.

"Separate from the formal intelligence community, it appears as if the Pentagon had contractors and former CIA officials doing private collecting for them," says Sam Gardiner, a retired air force colonel who teaches at the National Defense University. "The materials seem to have gone directly to the (National Security Council) and the White House. The State Department certainly did not have an opportunity to footnote their disagreement."

An aide to Rumsfeld suggested the defence secretary look at the work of the analysts on Feith's staff. At a Pentagon news conference last year, Rumsfeld said, "I was so interested in it, I said, 'Gee, why don't you go over and brief George Tenet?' So they did. They went over and briefed the CIA. So there's no -- there's no mystery about all this."

At the CIA, analysts listened to the Pentagon team, nodded politely, and said, "Thank you very much," said one government official. This official said the briefing did not change the agency's reporting or analysis in any substantial way.

Several current and former intelligence officials have said analysts at the CIA felt pressure to tailor their reports to conform to the administration's views, particularly the theories Feith's group developed. "There were a lot of questions from policy-makers," Kerr said, "and people feel there was a lot of pressure."

- - -

The debate over what the U.S. and Britain knew about Iraq's weapons of mass destruction -- and when they knew it -- has become so heated and public that it may affect the nature and usefulness of future intelligence operations.

For one thing, the unveiling of specific data about Iraq and its dissection in the media could make it harder to convince the spy services of other nations to co-operate fully again with U.S. or British counterparts. In the shadowy world of intelligence-sharing, few like uncontrolled publicity. Spies or other human-intelligence "assets" within target countries may become similarly leery.

For another, the Bush administration may now be the White House that cried wolf. Unless convincing evidence of Iraqi weapons of mass destruction surfaces, and soon, critics might charge that intelligence evidence regarding other crises, such as North Korea, is being manipulated for political purposes.

"We need public hearings, even an independent investigation," said Jim Walsh, an international-security expert at Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government.

If nothing else, Bush's new strategy of preemption, based on taking out regimes posing imminent threats, relies more on intelligence than on other tools. "The one thing the pre-emption strategy requires more than any other strategy we've had since the Second World War is intelligence not only of high quality, but intelligence that is seen as completely credible," Walsh said.

Each day that passes without evidence to back up either British or U.S. claims -- and with the daily ambushes of U.S. soldiers in Iraq -- there is growing skepticism about the war's rationale and whether Saddam posed an "imminent" threat.

"It's both important and worthwhile that we sort this thing out," says former CIA Director Stansfield Turner. "We should be concerned that ... our intelligence is being questioned. That's going to make it more difficult to keep up the program inside Iraq. But it's also going to make it more difficult to persuade other countries to go along with us on other operations around the world."

Journal News Services

GRAPHIC: Colour Photo: The White House, Via New York Times, File; George W. Bush rehearsing his state of the union speech last January. Building his case for war against Iraq, Bush said: "The British government has learned that Saddam Hussein recently sought significant quantities of uranium from Africa." The White House now concedes this was bad information and shouldn't have been included in the address.; Graphic;Diagram: Journal Stock; (See hard copy for Graphic;Diagram).


 
State may experience buildup of military forces

A reorganization of U.S. forces worldwide could bring a degree of military buildup to Hawai'i not seen since the Vietnam War, subsequently undoing much of the downsizing that followed the end of the Cold War.

Ambitious plans for a $1.5 billion Stryker brigade, eight C-17 cargo planes, and the possibility of an aircraft carrier strike group would re-orient some of the United States' most advanced firepower to the middle of the Pacific.

All of the additions could bring approximately 17,000 military members to O'ahu, counting their families — even more if carrier escort ships are added to Pearl Harbor.

"It's kind of interesting to look at the evolving military strategy here in Hawai'i because that mission has changed dramatically in the past 10 years," said Daniel Martinez, historian for the USS Arizona Memorial.

From a peak of 134,000 in 1988, the number of military and family members in Hawai'i in 2002 stood at 81,610, according to the Hawai'i Department of Business, Economic Development & Tourism.

There were 21 surface ships based at Pearl Harbor in 1988, compared with 11 today.

These days, it's all about speed — getting to the battle faster — and departing from Hawai'i cuts a week's sailing time to Asia for an aircraft carrier. The Army's goal is to be able to deliver a Stryker brigade of eight-wheeled vehicles anywhere in the world in 96 hours.

"We're talking about a much stronger mobile force that doesn't take days or weeks to get to an area of contention, it can literally take hours," Martinez said.

Not since World War II has a carrier been based here. The Navy also is looking at basing a carrier air wing of 70 to 80 aircraft on O'ahu and adding escort ships to Pearl Harbor.

"That (a carrier for Hawai'i) would be just a hugely dramatic shift," said Patrick Garrett, a military analyst for GlobalSecurity.org, a Virginia-based think tank.

It would be a huge shift economically, as well.

Military spends big

Jim Tollefson, president of the Chamber of Commerce of Hawai'i, said the changes would add significantly to the federal and defense spending that is second only to tourism dollars, Hawai'i's biggest source of income.

Federal spending totals about $9 billion in Hawai'i, compared to $11.7 billion for tourism, according to DBEDT. State economists say a better apples-to-apples comparison is made by subtracting taxes and pensions and using $5.4 billion for final federal and defense purchases.

"It's hard to really quantify the impact (of the military additions)," Tollefson said. "(But) I think it's going to be big dollars."

No comprehensive analysis has been done, and the military so far has released little information on the economic or environmental impacts of its plans.

The chamber estimates that for every $1 billion in military expenditures in Hawai'i, a multiplier effect results in $1.8 billion in revenues to Hawai'i businesses, and the creation of 24,650 jobs — mostly in military and civilian defense, but also in business and professional services, retail, construction and health services.

Civilian employment in the military in Hawai'i fluctuated between 19,350 people in 1990 and 16,508 people in 2002.

The San Diego Regional Chamber of Commerce calculated that each aircraft carrier based there has an annual economic impact of $270 million.

Of $126 million in annual payroll for a carrier crew of 3,200 — excluding an air wing — 87.8 percent, or $110 million, is spent in San Diego, said Kelly Cunningham, research director for the chamber.

Another $40 million is spent each year on Navy contracts for carrier maintenance.

An aircraft carrier and air wing of 5,500 would mean approximately 13,750 more people, including families, using a DBEDT formula of 1.5 family members for each Navy crew member.

The Army's Stryker brigade of 300 eight-wheeled vehicles is expected to mean $693 million in construction projects on O'ahu and the Big Island. The 2nd Brigade combat team of 3,500 soldiers is estimated to grow by 500 to 800 soldiers, and with families, the additional forces will represent 2,263 more people, the Army said.

The Air Force's basing plan for eight C-17 cargo carriers at Hickam and identical basing at Elmendorf Air Force Base in Alaska was projected to cost $425 million, and result in 500 additional personnel at Hickam.

C-17s and Strykers could arrive in 2005 and 2006. Other possible military plans include basing F/A-22 Raptors, the Air Force's stealth attack jet, in Hawai'i.

Opponents to further militarization of Hawai'i are raising alarm over the plans, saying they would cost Hawai'i in more lost and polluted land, and benefit Mainland firms that would get big construction jobs.

"We're very concerned about this buildup," said Kyle Kajihiro, program director for the American Friends Service Committee, a peace and justice organization founded by the Quakers. "Already the military controls so much land here — we were looking forward to some of those lands being cleaned up and returned after the end of the Cold War. But now it looks like they're even going to take back some of those lands."

The former Barbers Point Naval Air Station — now called Kalaeloa — is being eyed as a base for a carrier air wing. The Army, meanwhile, is seeking 1,500 to 2,100 acres adjacent to Schofield Barracks, 71 acres in Kahuku, and 23,000 additional acres on the Big Island for training with Stryker vehicles.

Kajihiro reiterated the oft-stated complaint that the military needs to clean up the land it has polluted before it uses even more.

"The military here is the largest polluter," Kajihiro said. "We've identified over a thousand contaminated sites, and they've failed to clean up the ones they have attempted to remediate — such as Kaho'olawe."

Cumulative effect noted

According to a 1995 summary of land holdings, the military controlled 90,817 acres on O'ahu, 108,902 acres on the Big Island, 4,498 acres on Kaua'i, 6,693 acres on Moloka'i, and 15 acres on Maui.

Kathy Ferguson, a political science professor and director of the women's studies program at the University of Hawai'i, said the cumulative effect of the proposed military additions have to be looked at.

"When you look at a piece at a time, you think, 'Oh, good, why not?' " she said. "And then you look at the whole picture and you think, 'That's an awful lot of people, that's an awful lot of land.' "

Ferguson, the co-author of "Oh, Say, Can You See? The Semiotics of the Military in Hawai'i," said the business community talks about how much military spending goes into the local economy, but "they don't look at things like, how much of that is spent in the (post exchange). That's not the local economy."

"What about the schools?" Ferguson added. "The impact aid, a few years ago when we did our research, it was 11 percent of the cost."

The federal government pays $1,400 in impact aid per pupil for the 30,000 military or "federally connected" students in the state school system for an education that costs the state $6,775 on average.

"So there are lots of hidden costs," Ferguson said.

A 1999 Navy study found that basing a carrier at Pearl Harbor without an air wing was anticipated to bring 3,217 crew members, add 1,018 family members to the civilian labor force and 606 children to O'ahu schools, with a net impact of $32.3 million in revenues over costs for the city and state.

Bill Paty, a World War II veteran, former Waialua Sugar Co. manager, and a civilian aide to the secretary of the Army, also pointed to efforts to privatize the construction and operation of military housing, which may contribute $2.2 billion to the economy over the next 10 years.

"We are going to be looking at, I think, a major infrastructure undertaking such as we haven't seen since World War II, if all of it comes together," he said.

Paty said the Navy alternatively is looking at basing an amphibious assault ship, a vessel used to transport Marines and launch Harrier jets and helicopters, at Pearl, but "that's not as up on the screen as the carrier."

He recalled that Hawai'i was a "pass-through" and rest and relaxation spot for the many ships and troops that came from somewhere else during the Vietnam War buildup.

"This (the proposed additions) is moving the forward presence of the United States 2,000 miles to the west," he said.


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26, 2012   Sep 27, 2012   Sep 28, 2012   Oct 1, 2012   Oct 2, 2012   Oct 3, 2012   Oct 4, 2012   Oct 5, 2012   Oct 8, 2012   Oct 9, 2012   Oct 11, 2012   Oct 16, 2012   Oct 17, 2012   Oct 19, 2012   Oct 25, 2012   Oct 30, 2012   Oct 31, 2012   Nov 1, 2012   Nov 2, 2012   Nov 6, 2012   Nov 7, 2012   Nov 8, 2012   Nov 13, 2012   Nov 15, 2012   Nov 16, 2012   Nov 20, 2012   Nov 21, 2012   Nov 22, 2012   Nov 23, 2012   Nov 27, 2012   Nov 28, 2012   Dec 3, 2012   Dec 7, 2012   Dec 10, 2012   Dec 12, 2012   Dec 17, 2012   Dec 19, 2012   Dec 20, 2012   Dec 21, 2012   Dec 25, 2012   Dec 28, 2012   Dec 29, 2012   Dec 30, 2012   Jan 2, 2013   Jan 8, 2013   Jan 10, 2013   Jan 11, 2013   Jan 15, 2013   Jan 22, 2013   Jan 28, 2013   Jan 29, 2013   Jan 30, 2013   Jan 31, 2013   Feb 1, 2013   Feb 4, 2013   Feb 7, 2013   Feb 8, 2013   Feb 11, 2013   Feb 12, 2013   Feb 13, 2013   Feb 14, 2013   Feb 15, 2013   Feb 18, 2013   Feb 19, 2013   Feb 20, 2013   Feb 22, 2013   Feb 23, 2013   Feb 25, 2013   Feb 26, 2013   Mar 2, 2013   Mar 4, 2013   Mar 6, 2013   Mar 8, 2013   Mar 11, 2013   Mar 13, 2013   Mar 14, 2013   Mar 18, 2013   Mar 19, 2013   Mar 21, 2013   Mar 22, 2013   Mar 26, 2013   Apr 1, 2013   Apr 2, 2013   Apr 3, 2013   Apr 5, 2013   Apr 9, 2013   Apr 16, 2013   Apr 17, 2013   Apr 23, 2013   Apr 30, 2013   May 3, 2013   May 6, 2013   May 8, 2013   May 10, 2013   May 14, 2013   May 22, 2013   May 24, 2013   May 30, 2013   Jun 7, 2013   Jun 12, 2013   Jun 14, 2013   Jun 17, 2013   Jun 21, 2013   Jun 25, 2013   Jun 27, 2013   Jun 28, 2013   Jun 29, 2013   Jul 2, 2013   Jul 4, 2013   Jul 5, 2013   Jul 6, 2013   Jul 9, 2013   Jul 10, 2013   Jul 15, 2013   Jul 16, 2013   Jul 17, 2013   Jul 18, 2013   Jul 22, 2013   Jul 26, 2013   Jul 29, 2013   Jul 31, 2013   Aug 2, 2013   Aug 5, 2013   Aug 9, 2013   Aug 12, 2013   Aug 13, 2013   Aug 15, 2013   Aug 16, 2013   Aug 20, 2013   Aug 27, 2013   Aug 29, 2013   Sep 10, 2013   Sep 12, 2013   Sep 13, 2013   Sep 20, 2013   Sep 24, 2013   Sep 26, 2013   Sep 27, 2013   Oct 1, 2013   Oct 3, 2013   Oct 4, 2013   Oct 8, 2013   Oct 9, 2013   Oct 11, 2013   Oct 15, 2013   Oct 18, 2013   Oct 23, 2013   Oct 26, 2013   Oct 28, 2013   Oct 29, 2013   Nov 2, 2013   Nov 7, 2013   Nov 8, 2013   Nov 15, 2013   Nov 19, 2013   Nov 23, 2013   Nov 25, 2013   Nov 28, 2013   Nov 30, 2013   Dec 2, 2013   Dec 3, 2013   Dec 4, 2013   Dec 6, 2013   Dec 10, 2013   Dec 11, 2013   Dec 13, 2013   Dec 16, 2013   Dec 20, 2013   Dec 21, 2013   Dec 28, 2013   Dec 30, 2013   Jan 2, 2014   Jan 3, 2014   Jan 7, 2014   Jan 8, 2014   Jan 9, 2014   Jan 10, 2014   Jan 11, 2014   Jan 16, 2014   Jan 18, 2014   Jan 20, 2014   Jan 21, 2014   Jan 22, 2014   Jan 23, 2014   Jan 25, 2014   Jan 27, 2014   Jan 28, 2014   Jan 30, 2014   Feb 4, 2014   Feb 5, 2014   Feb 8, 2014   Feb 10, 2014   Feb 11, 2014   Feb 12, 2014   Feb 13, 2014   Feb 14, 2014   Feb 17, 2014   Feb 18, 2014   Feb 21, 2014   Feb 24, 2014   Feb 25, 2014   Feb 27, 2014   Feb 28, 2014   Mar 3, 2014   Mar 10, 2014   Mar 11, 2014   Mar 12, 2014   Mar 13, 2014   Mar 15, 2014   Mar 17, 2014   Mar 19, 2014   Mar 20, 2014   Mar 21, 2014   Apr 1, 2014   Apr 3, 2014   Apr 7, 2014   Apr 10, 2014   Apr 14, 2014   Apr 16, 2014   Apr 22, 2014   Apr 23, 2014   Apr 24, 2014   Apr 29, 2014   May 3, 2014   May 5, 2014   May 7, 2014   May 8, 2014   May 10, 2014   May 12, 2014   May 14, 2014   May 15, 2014   May 16, 2014   May 20, 2014   May 21, 2014   May 23, 2014   May 26, 2014   May 29, 2014   May 31, 2014   Jun 3, 2014   Jun 5, 2014   Jun 9, 2014   Jun 10, 2014   Jun 16, 2014   Jun 17, 2014   Jun 20, 2014   Jun 21, 2014   Jun 24, 2014   Jun 25, 2014   Jun 30, 2014   Jul 2, 2014   Jul 3, 2014   Jul 5, 2014   Jul 7, 2014   Jul 8, 2014   Jul 9, 2014   Jul 10, 2014   Jul 11, 2014   Jul 12, 2014   Jul 15, 2014   Jul 17, 2014   Jul 19, 2014   Jul 21, 2014   Jul 22, 2014   Jul 23, 2014   Jul 26, 2014   Jul 29, 2014   Aug 1, 2014   Aug 4, 2014   Aug 12, 2014   Aug 15, 2014   Aug 22, 2014   Aug 29, 2014   Sep 5, 2014   Sep 9, 2014   Sep 11, 2014   Sep 13, 2014   Sep 16, 2014   Sep 18, 2014   Sep 29, 2014   Sep 30, 2014   Oct 1, 2014   Oct 2, 2014   Oct 4, 2014   Oct 6, 2014   Oct 15, 2014   Oct 16, 2014   Oct 17, 2014   Oct 21, 2014   Oct 23, 2014   Oct 25, 2014   Oct 27, 2014   Oct 29, 2014   Nov 6, 2014   Nov 11, 2014   Nov 13, 2014   Nov 18, 2014   Nov 20, 2014   Nov 21, 2014   Nov 22, 2014   Nov 25, 2014   Dec 1, 2014   Dec 3, 2014   Dec 11, 2014   Dec 17, 2014   Jan 15, 2015   Jan 16, 2015   Jan 19, 2015   Jan 28, 2015   Jan 30, 2015   Feb 2, 2015   Feb 3, 2015   Feb 6, 2015   Feb 10, 2015   Feb 11, 2015   Feb 14, 2015   Feb 17, 2015   Feb 18, 2015   Feb 23, 2015   Feb 25, 2015   Feb 28, 2015   Mar 2, 2015   Mar 6, 2015   Mar 7, 2015   Mar 9, 2015   Mar 10, 2015   Mar 17, 2015   Mar 19, 2015   Mar 30, 2015   Apr 4, 2015   Apr 7, 2015   Apr 11, 2015   Apr 14, 2015   Apr 17, 2015   Apr 18, 2015   Apr 21, 2015   Apr 29, 2015   May 2, 2015   May 4, 2015   May 6, 2015   May 12, 2015   May 14, 2015   May 16, 2015   May 20, 2015   May 23, 2015   May 26, 2015   May 27, 2015   May 30, 2015   Jun 1, 2015   Jun 2, 2015   Jun 9, 2015   Jun 16, 2015   Jun 20, 2015   Jun 26, 2015   Jul 1, 2015   Jul 2, 2015   Jul 4, 2015   Jul 6, 2015   Jul 8, 2015   Jul 10, 2015   Jul 11, 2015   Jul 16, 2015   Jul 18, 2015   Jul 23, 2015   Jul 25, 2015   Jul 29, 2015   Aug 1, 2015   Aug 3, 2015   Aug 6, 2015   Aug 10, 2015   Aug 18, 2015   Aug 21, 2015   Aug 24, 2015   Aug 31, 2015   Sep 3, 2015   Sep 9, 2015   Sep 15, 2015   Sep 17, 2015   Sep 21, 2015   Sep 22, 2015   Sep 25, 2015   Sep 28, 2015   Sep 29, 2015   Sep 30, 2015   Oct 2, 2015   Oct 6, 2015   Oct 9, 2015   Oct 10, 2015   Oct 17, 2015   Oct 20, 2015   Oct 26, 2015   Oct 27, 2015   Oct 28, 2015   Oct 31, 2015   Nov 7, 2015   Nov 14, 2015   Nov 28, 2015   Dec 10, 2015   Dec 15, 2015   Jan 19, 2016   Feb 3, 2016   Feb 16, 2016   Feb 23, 2016   Feb 26, 2016   Mar 9, 2016   Mar 22, 2016   Apr 16, 2016   Apr 22, 2016   May 4, 2016   May 7, 2016   May 8, 2016   May 19, 2016   May 31, 2016   Jun 4, 2016   Jun 11, 2016   Jun 16, 2016   Jun 28, 2016   Jul 4, 2016   Jul 11, 2016   Jul 16, 2016   Jul 17, 2016   Jul 21, 2016   Jul 25, 2016   Jul 31, 2016   Aug 5, 2016   Aug 17, 2016   Aug 27, 2016   Sep 2, 2016   Sep 13, 2016   Sep 22, 2016   Sep 27, 2016   Oct 4, 2016   Oct 8, 2016   Oct 25, 2016   Nov 17, 2016   Nov 28, 2016   Dec 9, 2016   Dec 14, 2016   Dec 31, 2016   Jan 26, 2017   Feb 10, 2017   Feb 14, 2017   Feb 23, 2017   Feb 28, 2017   Mar 2, 2017   Mar 7, 2017   Mar 16, 2017   Mar 18, 2017   Mar 31, 2017   Apr 1, 2017   Apr 10, 2017   Apr 15, 2017   Apr 18, 2017  

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