Flash Gordon Left Me The Keys

The TEST OF ALL MOTHERS

Sunday, July 27, 2003

 
US digs in for a deadly mind game

A GROUP of Iraqi civilians gathered beside a Baghdad road last week and erupted in cheers when they spotted American troops. It should have been a reassuring moment for the US forces who expected to be greeted as liberators for ousting Saddam Hussein but have been treated more like trespassers.

Yet the revellers on Highway1 were scarcely a comfort to Washington. Drawn to the scene by the sound of a large explosion, the Iraqis began cheering when they realised a US convoy had been attacked.

One truck was destroyed by either a remote-detonated landmine or a grenade. One American soldier was killed and three were wounded.

The incident symbolised a dismal week for 175,000 American and British troops as they struggled with an unruly populace, baking temperatures and fragile morale in what threatens to become a longer and more expensive stay than anyone at the White House or in Downing Street had bargained for.

A senior US general's unusually candid admission that anti-coalition resistance had hardened into a "classical guerrilla-type campaign" did little to curb unease that the operation to get rid of Saddam may be plunging into a quagmire.

Yet doomsday comparisons to Vietnam were given short shrift by General John Abizaid, the new Arabic-speaking chief of US Central Command. Abizaid, who made the "guerrilla" admission, appeared unshakably confident as he addressed his first Pentagon press briefing since he took over from General Tommy Franks.

"Look at the Arab press," said Abizaid, the son of Lebanese immigrants. "They say, 'We drove the Americans out of Beirut, we drove them out of Somalia, we'll drive them out of Baghdad.' And that's just not true. They are not driving us out of anywhere."

No sooner had Abizaid insisted that "we're going to win" than support arrived from an unexpected quarter. A survey by the British pollster YouGov found that more than 50% of 800 people questioned in Baghdad wanted coalition troops to stay in Iraq for at least a year. Almost three-quarters expect their lives to be better 12 months from now.

There was little doubt that a dangerous number of Iraqis remain bitterly resentful of the US presence in Iraq.

Another soldier was shot dead yesterday while guarding a bank, bringing the US toll in Iraq to 149.

Yet the YouGov poll confirmed that the Americans are not widely regarded as evil aggressors. Between the taunts of the anti-Americans and the retorts of a US general once known as the Pentagon's "mad Arab", it was clear a new phase in the battle for Iraqi hearts and minds had been joined.

At stake in what some in Washington have labelled the third Gulf war, costing $ 4billion a month, is not just the fate of Saddam and his Ba'ath party die hards, but the intriguing question of whether American troops can capitalise on cautious Iraqi optimism and finally be cheered in the Arab world for doing something right.

The challenge for Abizaid is whether he can provide a secure platform for new Iraqi leaders to emerge without them suffering the same fate as Mohammed Nayil al-Jurayfi. Denounced by some as a "collaborator" after he became mayor of the town of Haditha, al-Jurayfi and his eight-year-old-son died when gunmen sprayed their car with bullets last week.

The attack followed a series of assaults on Iraqis who have dared to assist the American reconstruction effort. Earlier this month seven US-trained Iraqi policemen were killed when a bomb exploded during their graduation ceremony. Last week the home of a police officer was firebombed after he served tea to US soldiers in his garden. Two of his teenage children were killed.

Despite the attacks, "we have not seen signs that this has stopped people from co-operating with us", said Paul Bremer, the US civilian administrator in Iraq.

Sabotage attempts have declined and councils are starting to function in some towns.

Yesterday the US opened the first recruitment centres in Iraq. Former soldiers below the rank of lieutenant-colonel can join the new Iraqi army, which the US hopes will grow to 30 battalions within two years.

US supplies are flooding into hospitals. And a new 25-member governing council, drawn from a broad spectrum of Iraqi political, religious and ethnic groups, has begun work on a constitution with the promise of elections as early as next year.

Paul Wolfowitz, the deputy US defence secretary, has arrived in Baghdad to focus on coalition successes and to emphasise American determination to complete the transition to a new democratic regime.

Yet complaints have proved impossible to ignore, not least because many have come from Iraqis who cheered the fall of Saddam. One doctor in the northwestern city of Qaim was outraged by the way American troops dumped the bodies of two teenagers who were killed while illegally attempting to cross the Syrian border.

"They dropped them off wrapped in blankets and without so much as an American signature on a document explaining what had happened so we could try to trace their relatives," the doctor said.

Other former Ba'athist professionals are furious that the Americans treat them as if they were all Saddam's thugs. University professors, hospital directors and mid-level bureaucrats have all been purged from their jobs in American-imposed "de-Ba'athification".

Iyad Allawi, a formerly exiled leader of the Iraqi National Accord and a member of the new governing council, said the dismantling of the entire Ba'athist establishment had been a mistake. "They should have removed the upper crust and left the rest to carry on with the day-to-day tasks and needs of the country," he said.

Forced searches of homes have been criticised by Iraqis as "offensive, unacceptable and dishonourable to our women". The use of sniffer dogs inside houses has outraged some Muslims who regard the animals as unclean.

The presence of African-American troops has also aroused latent racist tensions.

"To see them search our women is not only degrading but unbearable," one Iraqi claimed.

Few in Washington deny that the long-term viability of the reconstruction effort depends on Abizaid's ability to overcome such frictions. The best start, the general admitted, would be to catch Saddam, who has infuriated Washington with a series of taped messages encouraging the resistance.

But Abizaid also has to deal with complaints from his own troops. Angered by a Pentagon decision to delay their infantry division's return from Iraq, Private Clinton Deitz and some of his fellow soldiers turned themselves into instant celebrities last week by speaking on US television. "If Donald Rumsfeld (the defence secretary) was here, I'd ask him for his resignation," said Deitz.

Abizaid promptly warned that public criticism of Rumsfeld and President George Bush would not be tolerated. Another officer said: "Soldiers have bitched since the beginning of time. But what does 'bad morale' mean? That they're not combat-ready or loyal? Nobody here fits that definition."

Yet growing concern among military families fuelled reports yesterday that Washington may have to swallow its pride and turn to the United Nations for help.

US officials were said to be considering a new UN resolution that would open the door to international peacekeepers.

Washington has largely scorned the UN since it failed to approve the war, but the scale of the reconstruction effort has forced a rethink. Kofi Annan, the UN secretary-general, has urged the coalition to move quickly towards a restoration of Iraqi sovereignty.

Before American forces can leave, however, Abizaid must find a way of stopping persistent lethal guerrilla attacks that appear to have been planned before Baghdad fell.

Despite Rumsfeld's previous reluctance to categorise them as anything more than gangster opportunism, Abizaid painted a startling picture of what he called "Ba'athist remnants" organised across the country.

Former members of Saddam's intelligence service, Special Security Organisation and Special Republican Guard had "organised at the regional level in cellular structure", he said. They were operating in groups of six to eight people, armed with rocket-propelled grenades and machineguns. He added: "The resistance is getting more organised, and it is learning."

However, defence experts in Washington said the attacks, which have killed 35 US troops since Bush declared the war over in May, were sporadic. "This is a very far cry from Vietnam," said John Pike, an analyst with GlobalSecurity.org.

Other sources pointed to evidence that Saddam may have conceived of a guerrilla war long before the Americans invaded. The London-based Arab daily Al-Hayat published a document marked "top secret" that was purportedly found in Iraqi intelligence archives.

Entitled A Plan for Action in the Event of a Regime Downfall, it contains 11 orders for guerrilla-style resistance, including destroying power stations and "mobilising of dependable elements".

Saddam may be hoping the US will tire of casualties and hand control to a weak Iraqi government that would swiftly collapse. The Butcher of Baghdad might imagine being swept back to power on a wave of nostalgia for his iron rule.

An intelligence source last week insisted there was no sign that Saddam himself was orchestrating resistance. Nor are all the attacks being carried out by Saddam supporters. Abizaid identified several different culprits, including what he called "Al-Qaeda lookalikes".

Yesterday US forces claimed new success, announcing 1,200 arrests in sweeps in the area around Baghdad over the course of a week and the seizure of weapons. But danger loomed in the Shi'ite south, where a cleric denounced the governing council, despite its inclusion of several Shi'ite leaders.

"Do not stand by, hands folded, if this council does not express your opinion," declared Sheikh Muqtada al-Sadr, who told worshippers in the holy city of Najaf that "an Islamic army must be created and volunteers for this great army must come forward".

Previously implacable rivals, Iraqi Sunnis and Iranian-backed Shi'ites were briefly united in their complaints about American forces. Even Abizaid's Arabist sensibilities will be tested by the complex religious and political differences of the forces he needs to tame.

oThe former Iraqi information minister known as Comical Ali for his claims of victories even as Baghdad fell has been accused of ordering two murders while he was ambassador in Sweden nearly 20 years ago.

A criminal complaint was filed with Stockholm police last week. It accuses Mohammed Saeed al-Sahaf of ordering the deaths of Majid Hussein, a former captain in Saddam Hussein's secret police who had defected, and Azad Jundi, an asylum seeker.


 
Fort Lewis Stryker unit going to Iraq

Untested combat brigade likely to begin replacing troops in October

A newly created infantry unit based at Fort Lewis is among the forces the Army intends to send to Iraq to relieve soldiers who have been there since the war began, the Army's top general said yesterday.

The deployment would send at least 3,600 soldiers attached to the Stryker brigade -- the 3rd Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division -- to Iraq for six months starting in October. The combat unit, one of three such brigades at Fort Lewis, has no combat experience.

"We don't know what the mission is, exactly," said Lt. Col. Joseph Piek, an Army spokesman at Fort Lewis. "Where they go and what they will do has yet to be identified."

Gen. John Keane, the Army's acting chief of staff, unveiled the rotation plan at a press conference held at the Pentagon. It would bring home war-weary American troops from Iraq by replacing them with a mix of U.S. and Polish troops and set a limit of one year for U.S. troops to serve in Iraq.

Keane said that as part of the plan the service's 3rd Infantry Division and the Marine Corps' 1st Marine Expeditionary Force, the longest-serving forces in Iraq, will be on their way home in September.

Other Army combat units will rotate out of Iraq in the next 10 months, including units of the 101st Airborne Division, which carried out the raid this week that killed Saddam Hussein's sons, the 4th Infantry Division and the 1st Armored Division.

The rotation plan is aimed at boosting military morale by providing troops some certainty about the duration of their assignment in Iraq and by signaling to other troops yet-to-deploy that they will not face indefinite overseas commitments.

By deploying the Stryker brigade, the Army will have a chance to showcase a unit that is seen as emblematic of the transformation to 21st-century warfare.

The brigade draws its name from the new, high-tech vehicle it uses, an eight-wheeled, 20-ton armored troop carrier. The brigade has 300 Stryker vehicles, and each carries a $1.5 million price tag.

They were designed to fill the gap between the "heavy" but cumbersome Cold War-era armored forces and the rapid but less-lethal "light" units, such as airborne brigades.

The brigades are meant to handle a variety of tasks from combat to peacekeeping. John Pike, a defense analyst and director of GlobalSecurity.org, a military policy group, said the vehicles are designed for stability and support operations -- "what happens after major combat operations and before peace."

He said he believes the Stryker vehicles will strike a better balance between tanks and Humvees.

"One of the problems we have in Iraq right now is that we're annoying the local population with these tanks," Pike said. "We're either ripping up the roads with tanks and mechanized units. Or our light units are getting hit with rocket-propelled grenades and shot up."

In urban combat, the Stryker vehicles can get down narrow streets. "With a tank," Pike said, "anything smaller than a superhighway, and you have a problem."

The brigade has yet to be certified "combat ready," a process that requires the approval of the secretary of defense and Congress. In March, the brigade began its combat-certification training in the Mojave Desert and, afterward, at Fort Polk in Louisiana.

An Army official said that if Congress hasn't certified the brigade by the time of deployment, Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld can request a waiver.

Keane said military officials were seeking to "instill predictability in the force" with the rotation strategy that will limit the tour of incoming U.S. forces to no more than one year.

By comparison, U.S. troops currently serve six-month tours in Afghanistan, the Sinai Peninsula and the Balkans.

During the Vietnam War, U.S. forces typically served one-year tours.

Rumsfeld has said that the United States will maintain a force of about 148,000 service members in Iraq for the foreseeable future.

The Stryker brigade will replace the 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment. The rotation plan also includes the following troop swaps over the next year:

3rd Infantry Division will be replaced by elements of the 82nd Airborne Division in September.
1st Marine Expeditionary Forces will be replaced by Polish troops in September.
4th Infantry Division will be replaced by the 1st Infantry Division based in Europe and an "enhanced" National Guard brigade by April.
1st Armored Division will be replaced by 1st Cavalry Division and an infantry brigade supplied by the National Guard by April.
1st Cavalry Division will replace 2nd Light Cavalry Regiment by April.
A yet-to-be-named foreign force will replace the 101st Airborne Division by March.
2nd brigade of the 82nd Airborne won't be replaced and will return home by January.
173rd airborne brigade will not be replaced when it leaves in April.

Archives

Mar 21, 2003   Mar 22, 2003   Mar 23, 2003   Apr 1, 2003   Apr 2, 2003   Apr 4, 2003   Apr 5, 2003   Apr 6, 2003   Apr 9, 2003   Apr 10, 2003   Apr 14, 2003   Apr 15, 2003   Apr 16, 2003   Apr 18, 2003   Apr 22, 2003   Apr 24, 2003   Apr 25, 2003   Apr 27, 2003   Apr 29, 2003   Apr 30, 2003   May 1, 2003   May 3, 2003   May 6, 2003   May 7, 2003   May 15, 2003   May 16, 2003   May 17, 2003   May 18, 2003   May 19, 2003   May 24, 2003   May 28, 2003   May 29, 2003   May 30, 2003   Jun 3, 2003   Jun 5, 2003   Jun 6, 2003   Jun 7, 2003   Jun 9, 2003   Jun 10, 2003   Jun 12, 2003   Jun 16, 2003   Jun 17, 2003   Jun 18, 2003   Jun 19, 2003   Jun 21, 2003   Jun 28, 2003   Jul 8, 2003   Jul 9, 2003   Jul 16, 2003   Jul 20, 2003   Jul 24, 2003   Jul 27, 2003   Jul 31, 2003   Aug 3, 2003   Aug 4, 2003   Aug 18, 2003   Aug 29, 2003   Sep 5, 2003   Sep 20, 2003   Oct 10, 2003   Oct 26, 2003   Feb 13, 2004   Apr 8, 2004   Jul 27, 2004   Aug 12, 2004   Aug 13, 2004   Aug 24, 2004   Sep 15, 2004   Oct 31, 2004   Nov 17, 2004   Dec 2, 2004   Jan 17, 2005   May 14, 2005   Jul 29, 2005   May 18, 2006   Mar 1, 2007   Apr 29, 2007   May 31, 2007   Jun 5, 2007   Jun 22, 2007   Jul 5, 2007   Aug 1, 2007   Sep 2, 2007   Nov 9, 2007   Dec 3, 2007   Jan 5, 2008   Jan 22, 2008   Feb 3, 2008   Jun 7, 2008   Jul 11, 2008   Jul 17, 2008   Jul 19, 2008   Jul 22, 2008   Jul 24, 2008   Jul 29, 2008   Jul 31, 2008   Sep 11, 2008   Sep 24, 2008   Sep 30, 2008   Oct 8, 2008   Oct 29, 2008   Nov 12, 2008   Nov 18, 2008   Nov 25, 2008   Dec 31, 2008   Jan 13, 2009   Mar 9, 2009   Apr 7, 2009   May 8, 2009   Jun 11, 2009   Jul 3, 2009   Aug 3, 2009   Aug 12, 2009   Aug 13, 2009   Aug 14, 2009   Aug 21, 2009   Aug 27, 2009   Sep 2, 2009   Sep 8, 2009   Sep 18, 2009   Sep 25, 2009   Sep 29, 2009   Oct 1, 2009   Oct 5, 2009   Oct 13, 2009   Oct 19, 2009   Nov 11, 2009   Nov 13, 2009   Nov 18, 2009   Nov 19, 2009   Dec 7, 2009   Dec 27, 2009   Jan 1, 2010   Jan 20, 2010   Jan 25, 2010   Jan 29, 2010   Feb 16, 2010   Feb 24, 2010   Feb 26, 2010   Mar 4, 2010   Mar 5, 2010   Mar 6, 2010   Mar 23, 2010   Mar 30, 2010   Apr 6, 2010   Apr 15, 2010   May 5, 2010   Jun 2, 2010   Jun 17, 2010   Jul 10, 2010   Jul 16, 2010   Jul 21, 2010   Aug 4, 2010   Aug 19, 2010   Sep 14, 2010   Nov 11, 2010   Dec 21, 2010   Jan 1, 2011   Jan 13, 2011   Feb 8, 2011   Mar 23, 2011   Apr 29, 2011   May 10, 2011   May 17, 2011   May 19, 2011   May 24, 2011   Jun 1, 2011   Jul 23, 2011   Jul 26, 2011   Aug 10, 2011   Aug 25, 2011   Aug 29, 2011   Aug 31, 2011   Sep 2, 2011   Sep 8, 2011   Sep 26, 2011   Oct 4, 2011   Oct 20, 2011   Oct 25, 2011   Oct 27, 2011   Nov 1, 2011   Nov 3, 2011   Nov 4, 2011   Nov 9, 2011   Nov 17, 2011   Nov 21, 2011   Nov 23, 2011   Nov 30, 2011   Dec 9, 2011   Dec 19, 2011   Dec 21, 2011   Dec 22, 2011   Dec 25, 2011   Dec 30, 2011   Jan 2, 2012   Jan 4, 2012   Jan 5, 2012   Jan 6, 2012   Jan 11, 2012   Jan 12, 2012   Jan 13, 2012   Jan 16, 2012   Jan 21, 2012   Jan 24, 2012   Jan 30, 2012   Jan 31, 2012   Feb 1, 2012   Feb 2, 2012   Feb 3, 2012   Feb 6, 2012   Feb 7, 2012   Feb 9, 2012   Feb 10, 2012   Feb 13, 2012   Feb 14, 2012   Feb 15, 2012   Feb 16, 2012   Feb 17, 2012   Feb 20, 2012   Feb 21, 2012   Feb 23, 2012   Feb 24, 2012   Feb 28, 2012   Feb 29, 2012   Mar 1, 2012   Mar 2, 2012   Mar 5, 2012   Mar 6, 2012   Mar 9, 2012   Mar 12, 2012   Mar 13, 2012   Mar 14, 2012   Mar 15, 2012   Mar 16, 2012   Mar 17, 2012   Mar 20, 2012   Mar 21, 2012   Mar 22, 2012   Mar 23, 2012   Mar 26, 2012   Mar 28, 2012   Mar 29, 2012   Mar 30, 2012   Apr 2, 2012   Apr 3, 2012   Apr 4, 2012   Apr 9, 2012   Apr 10, 2012   Apr 11, 2012   Apr 12, 2012   Apr 13, 2012   Apr 16, 2012   Apr 17, 2012   Apr 18, 2012   Apr 19, 2012   Apr 20, 2012   Apr 23, 2012   Apr 24, 2012   Apr 25, 2012   Apr 26, 2012   Apr 27, 2012   Apr 30, 2012   May 2, 2012   May 3, 2012   May 4, 2012   May 7, 2012   May 8, 2012   May 9, 2012   May 10, 2012   May 11, 2012   May 14, 2012   May 15, 2012   May 16, 2012   May 17, 2012   May 18, 2012   May 22, 2012   May 23, 2012   May 24, 2012   May 25, 2012   Jun 4, 2012   Jun 5, 2012   Jun 7, 2012   Jun 8, 2012   Jun 9, 2012   Jun 11, 2012   Jun 12, 2012   Jun 14, 2012   Jun 15, 2012   Jun 22, 2012   Jun 25, 2012   Jun 26, 2012   Jun 28, 2012   Jun 29, 2012   Jul 3, 2012   Jul 5, 2012   Jul 6, 2012   Jul 9, 2012   Jul 10, 2012   Jul 11, 2012   Jul 12, 2012   Jul 13, 2012   Jul 19, 2012   Jul 23, 2012   Jul 25, 2012   Jul 27, 2012   Jul 28, 2012   Jul 30, 2012   Jul 31, 2012   Aug 1, 2012   Aug 3, 2012   Aug 6, 2012   Aug 8, 2012   Aug 9, 2012   Aug 10, 2012   Aug 13, 2012   Aug 14, 2012   Aug 15, 2012   Aug 16, 2012   Aug 21, 2012   Aug 22, 2012   Aug 23, 2012   Aug 24, 2012   Aug 27, 2012   Aug 28, 2012   Aug 29, 2012   Aug 30, 2012   Aug 31, 2012   Sep 3, 2012   Sep 4, 2012   Sep 5, 2012   Sep 6, 2012   Sep 7, 2012   Sep 10, 2012   Sep 11, 2012   Sep 13, 2012   Sep 14, 2012   Sep 18, 2012   Sep 19, 2012   Sep 21, 2012   Sep 25, 2012   Sep 26, 2012   Sep 27, 2012   Sep 28, 2012   Oct 1, 2012   Oct 2, 2012   Oct 3, 2012   Oct 4, 2012   Oct 5, 2012   Oct 8, 2012   Oct 9, 2012   Oct 11, 2012   Oct 16, 2012   Oct 17, 2012   Oct 19, 2012   Oct 25, 2012   Oct 30, 2012   Oct 31, 2012   Nov 1, 2012   Nov 2, 2012   Nov 6, 2012   Nov 7, 2012   Nov 8, 2012   Nov 13, 2012   Nov 15, 2012   Nov 16, 2012   Nov 20, 2012   Nov 21, 2012   Nov 22, 2012   Nov 23, 2012   Nov 27, 2012   Nov 28, 2012   Dec 3, 2012   Dec 7, 2012   Dec 10, 2012   Dec 12, 2012   Dec 17, 2012   Dec 19, 2012   Dec 20, 2012   Dec 21, 2012   Dec 25, 2012   Dec 28, 2012   Dec 29, 2012   Dec 30, 2012   Jan 2, 2013   Jan 8, 2013   Jan 10, 2013   Jan 11, 2013   Jan 15, 2013   Jan 22, 2013   Jan 28, 2013   Jan 29, 2013   Jan 30, 2013   Jan 31, 2013   Feb 1, 2013   Feb 4, 2013   Feb 7, 2013   Feb 8, 2013   Feb 11, 2013   Feb 12, 2013   Feb 13, 2013   Feb 14, 2013   Feb 15, 2013   Feb 18, 2013   Feb 19, 2013   Feb 20, 2013   Feb 22, 2013   Feb 23, 2013   Feb 25, 2013   Feb 26, 2013   Mar 2, 2013   Mar 4, 2013   Mar 6, 2013   Mar 8, 2013   Mar 11, 2013   Mar 13, 2013   Mar 14, 2013   Mar 18, 2013   Mar 19, 2013   Mar 21, 2013   Mar 22, 2013   Mar 26, 2013   Apr 1, 2013   Apr 2, 2013   Apr 3, 2013   Apr 5, 2013   Apr 9, 2013   Apr 16, 2013   Apr 17, 2013   Apr 23, 2013   Apr 30, 2013   May 3, 2013   May 6, 2013   May 8, 2013   May 10, 2013   May 14, 2013   May 22, 2013   May 24, 2013   May 30, 2013   Jun 7, 2013   Jun 12, 2013   Jun 14, 2013   Jun 17, 2013   Jun 21, 2013   Jun 25, 2013   Jun 27, 2013   Jun 28, 2013   Jun 29, 2013   Jul 2, 2013   Jul 4, 2013   Jul 5, 2013   Jul 6, 2013   Jul 9, 2013   Jul 10, 2013   Jul 15, 2013   Jul 16, 2013   Jul 17, 2013   Jul 18, 2013   Jul 22, 2013   Jul 26, 2013   Jul 29, 2013   Jul 31, 2013   Aug 2, 2013   Aug 5, 2013   Aug 9, 2013   Aug 12, 2013   Aug 13, 2013   Aug 15, 2013   Aug 16, 2013   Aug 20, 2013   Aug 27, 2013   Aug 29, 2013   Sep 10, 2013   Sep 12, 2013   Sep 13, 2013   Sep 20, 2013   Sep 24, 2013   Sep 26, 2013   Sep 27, 2013   Oct 1, 2013   Oct 3, 2013   Oct 4, 2013   Oct 8, 2013   Oct 9, 2013   Oct 11, 2013   Oct 15, 2013   Oct 18, 2013   Oct 23, 2013   Oct 26, 2013   Oct 28, 2013   Oct 29, 2013   Nov 2, 2013   Nov 7, 2013   Nov 8, 2013   Nov 15, 2013   Nov 19, 2013   Nov 23, 2013   Nov 25, 2013   Nov 28, 2013   Nov 30, 2013   Dec 2, 2013   Dec 3, 2013   Dec 4, 2013   Dec 6, 2013   Dec 10, 2013   Dec 11, 2013   Dec 13, 2013   Dec 16, 2013   Dec 20, 2013   Dec 21, 2013   Dec 28, 2013   Dec 30, 2013   Jan 2, 2014   Jan 3, 2014   Jan 7, 2014   Jan 8, 2014   Jan 9, 2014   Jan 10, 2014   Jan 11, 2014   Jan 16, 2014   Jan 18, 2014   Jan 20, 2014   Jan 21, 2014   Jan 22, 2014   Jan 23, 2014   Jan 25, 2014   Jan 27, 2014   Jan 28, 2014   Jan 30, 2014   Feb 4, 2014   Feb 5, 2014   Feb 8, 2014   Feb 10, 2014   Feb 11, 2014   Feb 12, 2014   Feb 13, 2014   Feb 14, 2014   Feb 17, 2014   Feb 18, 2014   Feb 21, 2014   Feb 24, 2014   Feb 25, 2014   Feb 27, 2014   Feb 28, 2014   Mar 3, 2014   Mar 10, 2014   Mar 11, 2014   Mar 12, 2014   Mar 13, 2014   Mar 15, 2014   Mar 17, 2014   Mar 19, 2014   Mar 20, 2014   Mar 21, 2014   Apr 1, 2014   Apr 3, 2014   Apr 7, 2014   Apr 10, 2014   Apr 14, 2014   Apr 16, 2014   Apr 22, 2014   Apr 23, 2014   Apr 24, 2014   Apr 29, 2014   May 3, 2014   May 5, 2014   May 7, 2014   May 8, 2014   May 10, 2014   May 12, 2014   May 14, 2014   May 15, 2014   May 16, 2014   May 20, 2014   May 21, 2014   May 23, 2014   May 26, 2014   May 29, 2014   May 31, 2014   Jun 3, 2014   Jun 5, 2014   Jun 9, 2014   Jun 10, 2014   Jun 16, 2014   Jun 17, 2014   Jun 20, 2014   Jun 21, 2014   Jun 24, 2014   Jun 25, 2014   Jun 30, 2014   Jul 2, 2014   Jul 3, 2014   Jul 5, 2014   Jul 7, 2014   Jul 8, 2014   Jul 9, 2014   Jul 10, 2014   Jul 11, 2014   Jul 12, 2014   Jul 15, 2014   Jul 17, 2014   Jul 19, 2014   Jul 21, 2014   Jul 22, 2014   Jul 23, 2014   Jul 26, 2014   Jul 29, 2014   Aug 1, 2014   Aug 4, 2014   Aug 12, 2014   Aug 15, 2014   Aug 22, 2014   Aug 29, 2014   Sep 5, 2014   Sep 9, 2014   Sep 11, 2014   Sep 13, 2014   Sep 16, 2014   Sep 18, 2014   Sep 29, 2014   Sep 30, 2014   Oct 1, 2014   Oct 2, 2014   Oct 4, 2014   Oct 6, 2014   Oct 15, 2014   Oct 16, 2014   Oct 17, 2014   Oct 21, 2014   Oct 23, 2014   Oct 25, 2014   Oct 27, 2014   Oct 29, 2014   Nov 6, 2014   Nov 11, 2014   Nov 13, 2014   Nov 18, 2014   Nov 20, 2014   Nov 21, 2014   Nov 22, 2014   Nov 25, 2014   Dec 1, 2014   Dec 3, 2014   Dec 11, 2014   Dec 17, 2014   Jan 15, 2015   Jan 16, 2015   Jan 19, 2015   Jan 28, 2015   Jan 30, 2015   Feb 2, 2015   Feb 3, 2015   Feb 6, 2015   Feb 10, 2015   Feb 11, 2015   Feb 14, 2015   Feb 17, 2015   Feb 18, 2015   Feb 23, 2015   Feb 25, 2015   Feb 28, 2015   Mar 2, 2015   Mar 6, 2015   Mar 7, 2015   Mar 9, 2015   Mar 10, 2015   Mar 17, 2015   Mar 19, 2015   Mar 30, 2015   Apr 4, 2015   Apr 7, 2015   Apr 11, 2015   Apr 14, 2015   Apr 17, 2015   Apr 18, 2015   Apr 21, 2015   Apr 29, 2015   May 2, 2015   May 4, 2015   May 6, 2015   May 12, 2015   May 14, 2015   May 16, 2015   May 20, 2015   May 23, 2015   May 26, 2015   May 27, 2015   May 30, 2015   Jun 1, 2015   Jun 2, 2015   Jun 9, 2015   Jun 16, 2015   Jun 20, 2015   Jun 26, 2015   Jul 1, 2015   Jul 2, 2015   Jul 4, 2015   Jul 6, 2015   Jul 8, 2015   Jul 10, 2015   Jul 11, 2015   Jul 16, 2015   Jul 18, 2015   Jul 23, 2015   Jul 25, 2015   Jul 29, 2015   Aug 1, 2015   Aug 3, 2015   Aug 6, 2015   Aug 10, 2015   Aug 18, 2015   Aug 21, 2015   Aug 24, 2015   Aug 31, 2015   Sep 3, 2015   Sep 9, 2015   Sep 15, 2015   Sep 17, 2015   Sep 21, 2015   Sep 22, 2015   Sep 25, 2015   Sep 28, 2015   Sep 29, 2015   Sep 30, 2015   Oct 2, 2015   Oct 6, 2015   Oct 9, 2015   Oct 10, 2015   Oct 17, 2015   Oct 20, 2015   Oct 26, 2015   Oct 27, 2015   Oct 28, 2015   Oct 31, 2015   Nov 7, 2015   Nov 14, 2015   Nov 28, 2015   Dec 10, 2015   Dec 15, 2015   Jan 19, 2016   Feb 3, 2016   Feb 16, 2016   Feb 23, 2016   Feb 26, 2016   Mar 9, 2016   Mar 22, 2016   Apr 16, 2016   Apr 22, 2016   May 4, 2016   May 7, 2016   May 8, 2016   May 19, 2016   May 31, 2016   Jun 4, 2016   Jun 11, 2016   Jun 16, 2016   Jun 28, 2016   Jul 4, 2016   Jul 11, 2016   Jul 16, 2016   Jul 17, 2016   Jul 21, 2016   Jul 25, 2016   Jul 31, 2016   Aug 5, 2016   Aug 17, 2016   Aug 27, 2016   Sep 2, 2016   Sep 13, 2016   Sep 22, 2016   Sep 27, 2016   Oct 4, 2016   Oct 8, 2016   Oct 25, 2016   Nov 17, 2016   Nov 28, 2016   Dec 9, 2016   Dec 14, 2016   Dec 31, 2016   Jan 26, 2017   Feb 10, 2017   Feb 14, 2017   Feb 23, 2017   Feb 28, 2017   Mar 2, 2017   Mar 7, 2017   Mar 16, 2017   Mar 18, 2017   Mar 31, 2017   Apr 1, 2017   Apr 10, 2017   Apr 15, 2017   Apr 18, 2017   May 4, 2017   May 12, 2017   May 16, 2017   May 19, 2017   May 27, 2017   Jun 2, 2017   Jun 9, 2017   Jun 12, 2017   Jun 15, 2017   Jun 23, 2017   Jun 24, 2017  

This page is powered by Blogger. Isn't yours?

Subscribe to Posts [Atom]