Flash Gordon Left Me The Keys

The TEST OF ALL MOTHERS

Friday, April 25, 2003

 
Mighty Ducks Defeat Stars 4-3 in 5 OTs

DALLAS (AP) -- After sweeping the defending Stanley Cup champion Detroit Red Wings in the first round, the Anaheim Mighty Ducks will have to do something pretty special to top that. They're off to a good start.

Overcoming a blown two-goal lead by their rock-solid goalie and a disallowed goal in the third overtime, the Ducks beat the Dallas Stars 4-3 on Petr Sykora's goal 48 seconds into a fifth overtime early Friday. It was the fourth-longest game in NHL history.

Anaheim players were too pooped to party after this one. They moved gingerly through the locker room, trying not to think about the fact Game 2 started in about 37 hours.

"I'm so proud of everybody in here," said Steve Thomas, who thought he'd scored the winner in the third OT until officials ruled that the net had come loose. "In the end, we came through because we persevered."

And because Sykora took a pass from Adam Oates and knocked it past the stick of Dallas goalie Marty Turco.
"It was a bang-bang play," Turco said. "That's the way it goes. We need to concentrate on emotionally getting back and preparing for Game 2. Of course it hurts. It hurts all over. But we've got to play tomorrow."

In the only other game Thursday night, New Jersey beat Tampa Bay 1-0 in Game 1 of the Eastern Conference series. Two other conference semifinal series open Friday night, with Philadelphia at Ottawa in the East, and Minnesota at Vancouver in the West.

The Mighty Ducks and Stars played 80 minutes, 48 seconds beyond regulation. The most recent game that lasted longer was No. 3 on the OT list, a 2-1 victory by Philadelphia over Pittsburgh on May 4, 2000. Keith Primeau had that winner after 92:01.

In real time, this one took 5:52 - from 6:40 p.m. until 12:32 a.m CDT.

"That's playoff hockey at it's finest right there," Dallas coach Dave Tippett said.

The seventh-seeded Ducks are 5-0 in the playoffs, with three wins in overtime. The Ducks have needed nine extra periods, but goalie Jean-Sebastien Giguere has made it worth every second.

In regulation, Giguere had his shakiest performance of the playoffs by allowing three goals. He gave up only six the entire Detroit series. Still, it was better than he did in two regular-season games against Dallas; he was chased from both, giving up seven goals in little more than four periods.

"The more you go into overtime, the easier it is for the goalies because the shots aren't as hard and the speed isn't there," Giguere said.

Giguere made 60 saves - 40 in the overtimes.

"The more you go into overtime, the easier it is for the goalies because the shots aren't as hard and the speed isn't there," Giguere said.

Of the ones that got by him, the costliest was a deflection by Brenden Morrow that tied the game with 2:47 left in regulation. It also was the easiest one to stop as it fluttered by his glove.

Turco made 50 saves and was at his best in the first overtime. Among his most memorable stops was using his shoulder to block a hard smash from Paul Kariya as the second OT expired.

When the eighth and final period began, the public address announcer said, "Good morning, Stars fans."

The deciding play began when Turco failed to corral the puck behind the net. While he skated back to the goal, Anaheim's Adam Oates pulled it off the boards and centered to a wide-open Sykora. Mike Leclerc also had an assist on what's certainly among the most memorable goals in the franchise's 10-year history.

"This is just a goal," said Sykora, who had one assist and no goals in the first round. "Hopefully this may get me out of the slump I've been in."

The winners surrounded Sykora in celebration, while the losers hurried to the comforts of their locker room. The remaining members of a crowd that started at 18,532 stood for a brief ovation.

"We played hard," Anaheim coach Mike Babcock said. "Guys are exhausted and guys are dehydrated, but a win gives you a chance to get your energy back."

Jason Krog, Rob Niedermayer and Steve Rucchin also scored for Anaheim, and Derian Hatcher and Jason Arnott added goals for Dallas.

Devils 3, Lightning 0

At East Rutherford, N.J., Martin Brodeur made 15 saves for his third shutout in four games, and Jamie Langenbrunner had a goal and an assist 3:47 apart in the third period.

Brodeur has 16th career playoff shutouts, second only to Patrick Roy's 23. John Madden and Turner Stevenson also scored.

Game 2 of the best-of-seven series is Saturday.


 
Mighty Ducks Defeat Stars 4-3 in 5 OTs

DALLAS (AP) -- After sweeping the defending Stanley Cup champion Detroit Red Wings in the first round, the Anaheim Mighty Ducks will have to do something pretty special to top that. They're off to a good start.

Overcoming a blown two-goal lead by their rock-solid goalie and a disallowed goal in the third overtime, the Ducks beat the Dallas Stars 4-3 on Petr Sykora's goal 48 seconds into a fifth overtime early Friday. It was the fourth-longest game in NHL history.

Anaheim players were too pooped to party after this one. They moved gingerly through the locker room, trying not to think about the fact Game 2 started in about 37 hours.

"I'm so proud of everybody in here," said Steve Thomas, who thought he'd scored the winner in the third OT until officials ruled that the net had come loose. "In the end, we came through because we persevered."

And because Sykora took a pass from Adam Oates and knocked it past the stick of Dallas goalie Marty Turco.
"It was a bang-bang play," Turco said. "That's the way it goes. We need to concentrate on emotionally getting back and preparing for Game 2. Of course it hurts. It hurts all over. But we've got to play tomorrow."

In the only other game Thursday night, New Jersey beat Tampa Bay 1-0 in Game 1 of the Eastern Conference series. Two other conference semifinal series open Friday night, with Philadelphia at Ottawa in the East, and Minnesota at Vancouver in the West.

The Mighty Ducks and Stars played 80 minutes, 48 seconds beyond regulation. The most recent game that lasted longer was No. 3 on the OT list, a 2-1 victory by Philadelphia over Pittsburgh on May 4, 2000. Keith Primeau had that winner after 92:01.

In real time, this one took 5:52 - from 6:40 p.m. until 12:32 a.m CDT.

"That's playoff hockey at it's finest right there," Dallas coach Dave Tippett said.

The seventh-seeded Ducks are 5-0 in the playoffs, with three wins in overtime. The Ducks have needed nine extra periods, but goalie Jean-Sebastien Giguere has made it worth every second.

In regulation, Giguere had his shakiest performance of the playoffs by allowing three goals. He gave up only six the entire Detroit series. Still, it was better than he did in two regular-season games against Dallas; he was chased from both, giving up seven goals in little more than four periods.

"The more you go into overtime, the easier it is for the goalies because the shots aren't as hard and the speed isn't there," Giguere said.

Giguere made 60 saves - 40 in the overtimes.

"The more you go into overtime, the easier it is for the goalies because the shots aren't as hard and the speed isn't there," Giguere said.

Of the ones that got by him, the costliest was a deflection by Brenden Morrow that tied the game with 2:47 left in regulation. It also was the easiest one to stop as it fluttered by his glove.

Turco made 50 saves and was at his best in the first overtime. Among his most memorable stops was using his shoulder to block a hard smash from Paul Kariya as the second OT expired.

When the eighth and final period began, the public address announcer said, "Good morning, Stars fans."

The deciding play began when Turco failed to corral the puck behind the net. While he skated back to the goal, Anaheim's Adam Oates pulled it off the boards and centered to a wide-open Sykora. Mike Leclerc also had an assist on what's certainly among the most memorable goals in the franchise's 10-year history.

"This is just a goal," said Sykora, who had one assist and no goals in the first round. "Hopefully this may get me out of the slump I've been in."

The winners surrounded Sykora in celebration, while the losers hurried to the comforts of their locker room. The remaining members of a crowd that started at 18,532 stood for a brief ovation.

"We played hard," Anaheim coach Mike Babcock said. "Guys are exhausted and guys are dehydrated, but a win gives you a chance to get your energy back."

Jason Krog, Rob Niedermayer and Steve Rucchin also scored for Anaheim, and Derian Hatcher and Jason Arnott added goals for Dallas.

Devils 3, Lightning 0

At East Rutherford, N.J., Martin Brodeur made 15 saves for his third shutout in four games, and Jamie Langenbrunner had a goal and an assist 3:47 apart in the third period.

Brodeur has 16th career playoff shutouts, second only to Patrick Roy's 23. John Madden and Turner Stevenson also scored.

Game 2 of the best-of-seven series is Saturday.


 
Teacher Suspended For Showing'Dracula'


FORT PIERCE, Fla. (AP) -- Usually, it's the students who get suspended for not asking permission.

A high school English teacher was suspended for three days after showing a class portions of the R-rated movie "Dracula" without the OK from administrators or parents.

Teacher Stephen McKee did not show any nudity or parts of the movie that prompted the R rating, but he should have sought approval before showing any movie rated anything other than G, Assistant Principal Terry Davis said.

McKee's English honors class viewed the first 20 minutes of the film as part of its study of the novel.

In a disciplinary letter, schools Superintendent Bill Vogel said teachers are required to protect students' physical and mental health and "the content of this video is inappropriate and unacceptable for the classroom."

McKee, a second-year teacher in the district, was also reprimanded in February for asking questions on a test that referred to a "blonde babe" and a classroom disturbance. Students said the questions offended them.

McKee did not immediately return a call to his home Wednesday


 
Lucent CEO Russo to Take Over COO Duties

TRENTON, N.J. (AP) -- Telecommunications gear maker Lucent Technologies is putting all its top management responsibilities on chairwoman and chief executive Patricia Russo.

The Murray Hill-based company on Thursday named Russo chief operating officer as well.

Current COO Bob Holder will leave Lucent this summer after working through a transition period. Holder, 56, has been in the position since October 2001, and began working for Lucent predecessor AT&T in 1977.

Russo, who became Lucent's CEO in January 2002, will begin assuming her duties soon. She will now oversee the 11 vice presidents who report to Holder. Russo took over as chairwoman in February when Henry Schacht retired. At that time she gave up the title of president and the company said it has no plans to fill that position.

"By consolidating these two positions, it gives her more direct management of the company," said Lucent spokeswoman Mary Ward. "It is better suited to the size company we are now."
Lucent once employed 120,000 people, but has trimmed the staff to less than 40,000 as its revenues plunged amid a severe slump in the telecommunications industry that has seen telephone companies and Internet service providers slash spending on the network gear Lucent makes. The company has posted huge losses over the past two years.

Ward said Russo, 50, wanted to manage day-to-day operations more closely, now that Lucent has resolved major problems. Those include a $415 million settlement of 54 shareholder lawsuits alleging company wrongdoing caused Lucent shares to plunge from a high of $84 each to below $2, and resolution of a Securities and Exchange Investigation concerning premature reporting of revenues in 2000.

Charles Elson, director of the Weinberg Center for Corporate Governance at the University of Delaware, said it's not uncommon for companies to have one person filling both the chief executive and chief operating officer roles. Some CEOs prefer having a COO "to groom a successor or if they don't have operational experience," he said.

"What the board has to ask themselves is, do they believe that Russo has the ability and the time" to handle both daily operations and long-term strategy, Elson said.

While Russo chairs Lucent's nine-member board of directors, seven of them are independent of the company. That gives them a majority of the votes, Elson said.

Ward said the change is not aimed at saving money. Russo's salary is $1.2 million a year, while Holder earns $900,000 annually.

Holder received a retention payment of $4.5 million when Russo was hired, part of what the company called a strategy to ensure key managers remained with Lucent while it completed the leadership transition and the massive restructuring.

Holder and other officers also have received numerous stock options and restricted stock units, although none but Russo received bonuses in the company's 2002 fiscal year. Russo got a $1.8 million bonus that year to compensate her for money she would have received had she remained longer at Eastman Kodak, where she had become president and chief operating officer in April 2001.

Shares of Lucent fell 6 cents, or 3.5 percent, to close Thursday at $1.66 on the New York Stock Exchange.
On the Net: http://www.lucent.com



 
Robot Soccer Promises Fierce Competition

PITTSBURGH (AP) -- The competition has become more intense, the passes and shots faster and more accurate, and the players - they no longer catch fire.

Carnegie Mellon University will play host to the first American Open of robot soccer next week, a regional competition leading up to the international RoboCup 2003 in Padua, Italy, this summer.

Robotics experts say technology has advanced greatly since the first RoboCup in 1997, when a handful of teams from the United States, Australia and Japan competed for the first time.

Last year's competition in Fukuoka, Japan, featured teams from 29 countries and drew 112,000 spectators, though organizers said the regional competition in Pittsburgh will not likely attract the same crowds.

The rules have remained largely the same, however. Once the buzzer sounds, there is no human interaction with the robots - autonomous machines that are programed to seek the ball, block opponents, pass to an open teammate and ultimately, to score.
The robots are programmed to react to thousands of possible game scenarios and communicate with each other about where the ball is and what strategy to employ.

"The first year of RoboCup we had robots catching on fire and you'd have to run and put them out. The robots would kind of crowd toward the ball and do a lot of nudging," said Peter Stone, an assistant professor of computer science at University of Texas at Austin. "Everything is so much faster now, a lot more passing and scoring from farther out. People say it's kind of like watching real soccer."

Stone will lead his UT Austin Villa team in competition beginning May 1.

A future goal for competitors is to create a robotic team that can defeat a human world-champion soccer team by 2050, much in the same spirit as the chess match between Garry Kasparov and IBM's Deep Blue.

There are three divisions for competitors: the Small-Size Robot League that uses color-coded wheeled robots about 10-inches square; the Sony Legged Robot League, which uses Sony AIBO robots that walk and kick the ball; and the Simulation League, which pits teams against one another in a simulated game viewed on large, overhead screens.

The crowd favorite are the AIBO robots that track the ball with a digital camera lodged in the nose and are prone to fun-bunch celebrations when a goal is scored.

Competitors say winning is nice, but the most important aspect is the competition that drives innovation and advances robotics technology.

"In 1997, the idea was really to get the robots to move around the field. If they moved in the right direction more than 50 percent of the time, it was a great thing," said Brett Browning, a systems scientist for Carnegie Mellon. "We have reached the point where we are seeking maximum speeds, creating strategies and coding to allow the robots to adapt during play."

There is no monetary award for the competition. The payoff, competitors say, is shared information, either from speaking with others during competition, or with the publication of source codes by successful teams.

"Why did we land a man on the moon? What was the point of the Apollo mission?" Stone asked. "Scientific challenges lead to answers and solve problems that affect people every day."
On the Net:

American Open/CMU: http://www.cmu.edu/cmnews/extra/030405-robocup.html

UT Austin Villa: http://www.cs.utexas.edu/AustinVilla



 
Robot Soccer Promises Fierce Competition

PITTSBURGH (AP) -- The competition has become more intense, the passes and shots faster and more accurate, and the players - they no longer catch fire.

Carnegie Mellon University will play host to the first American Open of robot soccer next week, a regional competition leading up to the international RoboCup 2003 in Padua, Italy, this summer.

Robotics experts say technology has advanced greatly since the first RoboCup in 1997, when a handful of teams from the United States, Australia and Japan competed for the first time.

Last year's competition in Fukuoka, Japan, featured teams from 29 countries and drew 112,000 spectators, though organizers said the regional competition in Pittsburgh will not likely attract the same crowds.

The rules have remained largely the same, however. Once the buzzer sounds, there is no human interaction with the robots - autonomous machines that are programed to seek the ball, block opponents, pass to an open teammate and ultimately, to score.
The robots are programmed to react to thousands of possible game scenarios and communicate with each other about where the ball is and what strategy to employ.

"The first year of RoboCup we had robots catching on fire and you'd have to run and put them out. The robots would kind of crowd toward the ball and do a lot of nudging," said Peter Stone, an assistant professor of computer science at University of Texas at Austin. "Everything is so much faster now, a lot more passing and scoring from farther out. People say it's kind of like watching real soccer."

Stone will lead his UT Austin Villa team in competition beginning May 1.

A future goal for competitors is to create a robotic team that can defeat a human world-champion soccer team by 2050, much in the same spirit as the chess match between Garry Kasparov and IBM's Deep Blue.

There are three divisions for competitors: the Small-Size Robot League that uses color-coded wheeled robots about 10-inches square; the Sony Legged Robot League, which uses Sony AIBO robots that walk and kick the ball; and the Simulation League, which pits teams against one another in a simulated game viewed on large, overhead screens.

The crowd favorite are the AIBO robots that track the ball with a digital camera lodged in the nose and are prone to fun-bunch celebrations when a goal is scored.

Competitors say winning is nice, but the most important aspect is the competition that drives innovation and advances robotics technology.

"In 1997, the idea was really to get the robots to move around the field. If they moved in the right direction more than 50 percent of the time, it was a great thing," said Brett Browning, a systems scientist for Carnegie Mellon. "We have reached the point where we are seeking maximum speeds, creating strategies and coding to allow the robots to adapt during play."

There is no monetary award for the competition. The payoff, competitors say, is shared information, either from speaking with others during competition, or with the publication of source codes by successful teams.

"Why did we land a man on the moon? What was the point of the Apollo mission?" Stone asked. "Scientific challenges lead to answers and solve problems that affect people every day."
On the Net:

American Open/CMU: http://www.cmu.edu/cmnews/extra/030405-robocup.html

UT Austin Villa: http://www.cs.utexas.edu/AustinVilla



 
NEW YORK) A video camera planted in the chambers of a Brooklyn judge caught him taking cash and gifts -- including a box of cigars -- to influence divorce cases, authorities charged Thursday.

The sting resulted in the arrest of State Supreme Court Justice Gerald P. Garson, 72, on corruption charges. Prosecutors said it was the first time video surveillance was used against a state judge in his own chambers.

"We had probable cause to believe criminal activity would be taking place in that area," Brooklyn District Attorney Charles Hynes said. As for Garson, Hynes said, "His career is in shambles."

Prosecutors also announced a special grand jury has been convened to investigate possible corruption in the judge-selection process. News reports said Garson -- after confronted with the surveillance tape -- told investigators that judgeships could be "bought and sold" in Brooklyn.

The judge was arraigned Thursday on a charges of official misconduct along with five co-defendants, including a lawyer and court employees. Their lawyers said they were innocent.

Garson -- who was photographed smoking a cigar when he surrendered Wednesday night -- "completely denies the allegations," said his attorney, Stanford Bandelli.

If convicted, Garson faces up to four years in prison. He was released on $15,000 bail.

Court officials said they are still trying to determine how many cases may have been tainted. They said they are reviewing Garson's past cases for signs of wrongdoing.

The investigation was launched in October after an unidentified woman complained to authorities that a con man was roaming the courthouse, soliciting bribes to fix matrimonial cases.

Authorities allege that in exchange for bribes of up to $10,000, the con man, the accused attorney and court personnel would scheme to bypass a random assignment policy and route cases to Garson.

After another judge authorized the use of video eavesdropping, investigators recorded the attorney meeting Garson in his chambers and plying him with a box of cigars and $1,000, a criminal complaint said. The lawyer also was overheard in intercepted conversations bragging that he had bought the judge dinner at Brooklyn restaurants and loaned him money in exchange for favors, it added.

The gifts were given as a reward for "ex parte advice" about cases the lawyer was trying before Garson, "including advice as to the merits of the case, and questions to ask witnesses," the complaint said.

The case is the second prosecution of a Brooklyn judge in recent months for Hynes' office.

Last October, former judge Victor Barron was led out of a Brooklyn courtroom in handcuffs after being sentenced to three to nine years in prison for soliciting a bribe from a lawyer in a personal injury case.

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10, 2014   Mar 11, 2014   Mar 12, 2014   Mar 13, 2014   Mar 15, 2014   Mar 17, 2014   Mar 19, 2014   Mar 20, 2014   Mar 21, 2014   Apr 1, 2014   Apr 3, 2014   Apr 7, 2014   Apr 10, 2014   Apr 14, 2014   Apr 16, 2014   Apr 22, 2014   Apr 23, 2014   Apr 24, 2014   Apr 29, 2014   May 3, 2014   May 5, 2014   May 7, 2014   May 8, 2014   May 10, 2014   May 12, 2014   May 14, 2014   May 15, 2014   May 16, 2014   May 20, 2014   May 21, 2014   May 23, 2014   May 26, 2014   May 29, 2014   May 31, 2014   Jun 3, 2014   Jun 5, 2014   Jun 9, 2014   Jun 10, 2014   Jun 16, 2014   Jun 17, 2014   Jun 20, 2014   Jun 21, 2014   Jun 24, 2014   Jun 25, 2014   Jun 30, 2014   Jul 2, 2014   Jul 3, 2014   Jul 5, 2014   Jul 7, 2014   Jul 8, 2014   Jul 9, 2014   Jul 10, 2014   Jul 11, 2014   Jul 12, 2014   Jul 15, 2014   Jul 17, 2014   Jul 19, 2014   Jul 21, 2014   Jul 22, 2014   Jul 23, 2014   Jul 26, 2014   Jul 29, 2014   Aug 1, 2014   Aug 4, 2014   Aug 12, 2014   Aug 15, 2014   Aug 22, 2014   Aug 29, 2014   Sep 5, 2014   Sep 9, 2014   Sep 11, 2014   Sep 13, 2014   Sep 16, 2014   Sep 18, 2014   Sep 29, 2014   Sep 30, 2014   Oct 1, 2014   Oct 2, 2014   Oct 4, 2014   Oct 6, 2014   Oct 15, 2014   Oct 16, 2014   Oct 17, 2014   Oct 21, 2014   Oct 23, 2014   Oct 25, 2014   Oct 27, 2014   Oct 29, 2014   Nov 6, 2014   Nov 11, 2014   Nov 13, 2014   Nov 18, 2014   Nov 20, 2014   Nov 21, 2014   Nov 22, 2014   Nov 25, 2014   Dec 1, 2014   Dec 3, 2014   Dec 11, 2014   Dec 17, 2014   Jan 15, 2015   Jan 16, 2015   Jan 19, 2015   Jan 28, 2015   Jan 30, 2015   Feb 2, 2015   Feb 3, 2015   Feb 6, 2015   Feb 10, 2015   Feb 11, 2015   Feb 14, 2015   Feb 17, 2015   Feb 18, 2015   Feb 23, 2015   Feb 25, 2015   Feb 28, 2015   Mar 2, 2015   Mar 6, 2015   Mar 7, 2015   Mar 9, 2015   Mar 10, 2015   Mar 17, 2015   Mar 19, 2015   Mar 30, 2015   Apr 4, 2015   Apr 7, 2015   Apr 11, 2015   Apr 14, 2015   Apr 17, 2015   Apr 18, 2015   Apr 21, 2015   Apr 29, 2015   May 2, 2015   May 4, 2015   May 6, 2015   May 12, 2015   May 14, 2015   May 16, 2015   May 20, 2015   May 23, 2015   May 26, 2015   May 27, 2015   May 30, 2015   Jun 1, 2015   Jun 2, 2015   Jun 9, 2015   Jun 16, 2015   Jun 20, 2015   Jun 26, 2015   Jul 1, 2015   Jul 2, 2015   Jul 4, 2015   Jul 6, 2015   Jul 8, 2015   Jul 10, 2015   Jul 11, 2015   Jul 16, 2015   Jul 18, 2015   Jul 23, 2015   Jul 25, 2015   Jul 29, 2015   Aug 1, 2015   Aug 3, 2015   Aug 6, 2015   Aug 10, 2015   Aug 18, 2015   Aug 21, 2015   Aug 24, 2015   Aug 31, 2015   Sep 3, 2015   Sep 9, 2015   Sep 15, 2015   Sep 17, 2015   Sep 21, 2015   Sep 22, 2015   Sep 25, 2015   Sep 28, 2015   Sep 29, 2015   Sep 30, 2015   Oct 2, 2015   Oct 6, 2015   Oct 9, 2015   Oct 10, 2015   Oct 17, 2015   Oct 20, 2015   Oct 26, 2015   Oct 27, 2015   Oct 28, 2015   Oct 31, 2015   Nov 7, 2015   Nov 14, 2015   Nov 28, 2015   Dec 10, 2015   Dec 15, 2015   Jan 19, 2016   Feb 3, 2016   Feb 16, 2016   Feb 23, 2016   Feb 26, 2016   Mar 9, 2016   Mar 22, 2016   Apr 16, 2016   Apr 22, 2016   May 4, 2016   May 7, 2016   May 8, 2016   May 19, 2016   May 31, 2016   Jun 4, 2016   Jun 11, 2016   Jun 16, 2016   Jun 28, 2016   Jul 4, 2016   Jul 11, 2016   Jul 16, 2016   Jul 17, 2016   Jul 21, 2016   Jul 25, 2016   Jul 31, 2016   Aug 5, 2016   Aug 17, 2016   Aug 27, 2016   Sep 2, 2016   Sep 13, 2016   Sep 22, 2016   Sep 27, 2016   Oct 4, 2016   Oct 8, 2016   Oct 25, 2016   Nov 17, 2016   Nov 28, 2016   Dec 9, 2016   Dec 14, 2016   Dec 31, 2016   Jan 26, 2017   Feb 10, 2017   Feb 14, 2017   Feb 23, 2017   Feb 28, 2017   Mar 2, 2017   Mar 7, 2017   Mar 16, 2017   Mar 18, 2017  

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